Tragic Love Story In The Great Gatsby

900 words - 4 pages

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald depicts a tragic love story between the main character, Jay Gatsby and his lover, Daisy Buchanan. Nick Carraway narrates about their love relationship tragically because only Gatsby shows his loves towards Daisy. Jay Gatsby is a young man who comes from poor family and he falls in love with Daisy, a wealthy, “the king’s daughter, the golden girl” (Fitzgerald 128). They have been separated for almost ten years as Gatsby goes off to war. While away from Daisy, he tries very hard to reach the American dream and be at the same social class with Daisy as there is no marriage between rich and poor people in the year back then. Jay Gatsby does everything that can impress and win Daisy’s heart back when they meet each other. He spends his lifetime waiting for Daisy, buys a house that is located across Daisy’s house and wills to die for his love towards Daisy. I believe that, The Great Gatsby is a tragic love story because Nick tells the reader that Jay Gatsby sacrifices everything including his own life just to show how deep Gatsby’s love towards Daisy.
True love in the novel can be seen when Jay Gatsby spends most of his lifetime waiting for Daisy where in fact he can have a lots of women as he is still young. Even though he comes from poor family but because of his determination in loving Daisy has led him to reach American dream. One of the events in the novel where he confesses to Tom that “She [Daisy] only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me” shows that even he knows the fact that rich girl will never marry a poor man but he does not feel offended about it (139). Despite, he puts all his efforts in order to be in the same social class like Daisy because his unconditional love towards Daisy. Gatsby puts himself in a dangerous situation by doing illegal business. He sells alcohol in drug stores which is against the law during that time of period. He has come to an extent where he could not comply with the law in his country because he needs money to impress Daisy.
In addition, Jay Gatsby buys a house “so that Daisy would be just across the bay” (85). This is the one of the proofs where we can see how deep is Gatsby’s love towards Daisy. He chooses this place because his life is revolved around Daisy. He buys the mansion just to impress Daisy, attract her and get the chance to meet her by throwing out parties. He does...

Find Another Essay On Tragic love story in The Great Gatsby

Jay Gatsby: The Great American Tragic Hero

902 words - 4 pages disillusionments. Gatsby’s steadfast determination to reconstruct his past led to his demise. Furthermore, Gatsby's capacity to forgive, his idealistic dream of loving Daisy, and his ability to make a name for himself demonstrated his “greatness”. In the first few chapters, it was inconceivable to imagine Jay Gatsby as “great.” His involvement in clandestine business affairs with Meyer Wolfshiem led to shocking theories as to how he amassed his wealth

Does Love Justify the Means in The Great Gatsby

1101 words - 4 pages not love him at the time. He was an average man, not a very high status in the community, while Daisy was wealthy and had a decent status in the community. Gatsby was drawn to this and he knew that he had to make her his, but the Great War had ruined his plans on any future with her. Gatsby claims in the story that they had fallen madly in love when they were together, but I do not think that is the case. If Daisy actually loved Gatsby for who he

Jay Gatsby as Tragic Hero of Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

971 words - 4 pages . Gatsby believes in The Great American Dream, for that is where the basis for his ideal originated. Later, the concept develops into an obsession with money and more so, Daisy.       Gatsby's tragic flaw lies within his inability to see that the real and the ideal cannot coexist. Gatsby's ideal is Daisy. He sees her as perfect and worthy of all his affections and praise. In reality she is undeserving and through her actions, proves she is

Love at All Costs In "The Great Gatsby" by Fitzgerald

969 words - 4 pages Ben Johnson wanted to be the fastest man in the world. To attain this goal, he took steroids. He attempted to gain success at all costs. Much like Ben, Jay Gatsby attempted to achieve the love of Daisy Buchanan with reckless regard for the truth. He used immoral methods to change his social position, threw extravagant parties, and refused to see reality. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's 'The Great Gatsby' Jay Gatsby attempted to achieve his goal of

Daisy's love in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby"

1108 words - 4 pages In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, thecharacter of Daisy Buchanan has many instances whereher life and love of herself, money, and materialismcome into play. Daisy is constantly portrayed assomeone who is only happy when things are being givento her and circumstances are going as she has plannedthem. Because of this, Daisy seems to be the characterthat turns Fitzgerald's story from a tale of waywardlove to a saga of unhappy

The Story Behind The Great Gatsby

2388 words - 10 pages The Story Behind The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby by Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald is a novel that eloquently summarizes what the entire American society represents through Fitzgerald’s view. This novel develops its story in New York, at a time when the jazz age was at its peak. The roaring twenties, the era of glamour, infringed prohibition, conflict, growth and prosperity. The main concern in that age was materialism, sex, booze, and

"The Great Gatsby" By: F. Scott Fitzgerald The tragic result of the American Dream in it's false reality

746 words - 3 pages The Great Gatsby, a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Has a central theme, the American Dream and it's tragic result of those who attempt to capture its false reality. For Jay Gatsby, the dream becomes real through wealth and power, and he maintains that all this glory will result in happiness. To get this bliss Jay chooses to use the drive of love to justify the illegal ways of reaching "the American Dream". Many of the 19th century

How does Fitzgerald tell the story of 'The Great Gatsby' in chapter 7?

1275 words - 5 pages How does Fitzgerald tell the story of 'The Great Gatsby' in chapter 7?In 'The Great Gatsby' there is a transformation in chapter 7, when Fitzgerald shows that all the happiness and glamour of Gatsby's life has suddenly deteriorated. As readers we are saddened by this change because Gatsby is a profound and heroic character, full of ambition and determination. Even though his quest and fixated desire for Daisy was irrational, we admire how

Great Gatsby is a tragic hero

940 words - 4 pages F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby is a classic American tragedy. The novel has all the basic elements necessary to classify a story as a tragedy: a tragic hero, his character flaw, and a twist of fate which results in the hero's ultimate destruction. Jay Gatsby is the doomed tragic hero, blinded by his irrational dream to relive the past. Fate interferes in the form of the unexpected manslaughter of one character's mistress by his wife. All

The Love Triangle in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

805 words - 3 pages The Great Gatsby contains a love triangle between Tom Buchanan, Daisy Buchanan, and Jay Gatsby. Initially, Daisy was in love with Gatsby, but she married Tom while he was away at war. Gatsby was left brokenhearted with a strong determination to win her back and prove that he was worthy of her. Tom Buchanan and Jay Gatsby are vastly different people with two things in common; their money and, most importantly, their desire to have Daisy. Tom

Love between Social Classes in The Grapes of Wrath and The Great Gatsby

1670 words - 7 pages Fitzgerald put forth in their novels, The Grapes of Wrath and The Great Gatsby, are not exceptions. Specifically, the theme of love across social classes shines through both novels, exhibited in the ineffable drive to lend oneself to another person of a lower class deserving of help. The ineffable love that shines through both novels does not just span the separation of social class, but it does so silently, with no trace of its beginning except

Similar Essays

Love In The Great Gatsby Essay

935 words - 4 pages The great Gatsby can be characterized as being one of the great American love stories of the 20th century. Love is a major theme throughout the novel, whether it is between Tom and Myrtle, nick and Jordan or Gatsby and Daisy. Although all the affairs in the novel seems tangled they are very different form each other.One of the affairs in the novel is the relationship between Tom and Myrtle. They met for the first time on a train when myrtle was

Forbidden Love In The Great Gatsby

1604 words - 6 pages captures the carless and wild period quite like F. Scott Fitzgerald did in The Great Gatsby. Although Gatsby’s wealth was not overnight we have to respect him because he worked for it. He may have had to do some wrong things to get there but at least he was motivated and dedicated. All Gatsby wanted to do was impress Daisy. He loved her more than he even knew he did. It sad but in the end love really does kill Jay Gatsby. Works Cited Avey, Tori

The Tragic Hero Of The Great Gatsby

1500 words - 6 pages Achilles' hamartia was his heel, Samson's was his love for Delilah, and Hamlet's was his indecisiveness. The definition of hamartia is a fatal flaw that leads to the downfall of a hero. In each of these heroes' cases, they had a specific flaw lead to their demise. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, The Great Gatsby: the main character, Jay Gatsby is the tragic hero. Like all tragic heroes, he inspires the feeling of sympathy from readers

The Great Gatsby Is A Tragic H

891 words - 4 pages A tragic hero can best be defined as a person of significance, who has a tragic flaw and who meets his or her fate with courage and nobility of spirit. In The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby is a tragic hero.Jay Gatsby is an enormously rich man, and in the flashy years of the jazz age, wealth defined importance. Gatsby has endless wealth, power and influence but never uses material objects selfishly. Everything he owns exists only to attain his vision