Transformation And Self Realization In The Play “A Doll’s House” By Henrik Ibsen

1265 words - 5 pages

“A Doll’s House”
In the play “A Doll’s House” by Henrik Ibsen, Nora goes through a transformation of self-realization. Nora lives a doll-like existence. she responds lovingly to her husband’s pet names such as “my little lark” or “my little squirrel” (Ibsen, 793). She does not mind playing a role for her husband. As the play progresses, Nora show that she is not a little girl. She understands how business work by taking out a loan behind her husband’s back to save his life. When she is blackmail by Krogstad, her eyes open to her unfulfilled and underappreciated life. she realizes that she been putting on a show for her husband. Nora has pretended to be someone else in order to fulfilled a role for not only her husband but also her father and society.
Ibsen’s play shows a bleak picture of the role women held in society. Nora is well off compared to other female characters of the play but still lives a difficult life because she is in a loveless marriage and her husband is condescending towards her, he says to her “Hasn’t Miss Sweet-Tooth been breaking rules in

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town to-day?” (Ibsen, 795) He treats her like a child before Torvald asked her. Nora “[puts the bag of macaroons into her pocket and wipes her mouth]” (Ibsen, 793). Nora is not allow to have sweets and has to go behind her husband’s back. She is afraid of getting into trouble. Torvald also downplays her asking, “What are little people called that are always wasting money?” She replies “Spendthrifts- I know” (Ibsen, 795). His belief is that a man’s role is to protect and guide his wife, but he acts like Nora’s second father by giving her money and attempting to instruct her on how to behave.
The setting is around Christmas time, and Nora buys a Christmas tree to put in the center of the living room. The Christmas tree is a very important symbol of this play. A Christmas tree is a festive object meant for decorative purposes; this symbolizes Nora’s position in her home as a plaything that is also pleasing to look at. When Nora instructs the maid to “Hide the Christmas tree carefully… Be sure the children do not see it till this evening, when it is dress ” (Ibsen, 793). It is parallel to Nora’s life when she tells Torvald that no one can see her in her dress until the evening of her tarantella dance. She is the tree that nobody can see until it is “dressed”. A life cycle of Christmas trees is that they are grown in their natural settings, then chopped down and moved into a house where the family decorates it while it is dying. This can be related to Nora’s life she no longer lives with her father and is taken out of her natural settings, in a sense decorated for

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Torvald to look at something pretty. When the tree is stripp of its ornaments with its burnt down candle ends on it’s disheveled branches. It reflects how Nora’s is feeling stripped of her “decorations” and disheveled from Krogstead’s blackmail letter.
Now that Krogstad is fired from the bank, He is blackmailing...

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