Transition To Democracy Essay

2030 words - 8 pages

Since the initiation of the Third Wave of Democracy, several countries have attempted to form a democratic system of governs. We take note that not all have succeeded. At the dawn of this era, democracy was being applied to countries with no prior history of a governing body that was place by the people for the people hence success of such a system could not be guaranteed because of the innumerous variables that existed in each country. People being the highlighted factor of variance, it may become easier to understand how countries such as Pakistan and Nigeria, both countries prior to the Wave had no local governing machinery. Pakistan further endured a partition from India which resulted in not only an instant religious and infrastructural void but over the course of a year turned out to take a heavy toll on human life as well. In the contrast, Spain however had a failed attempt at nabbing democracy but the people were foiled by the fascist dictator who maintained a monarchy that lasted over two decades. Alongside this, upon joining the European Union it created one of the largest consistently expanding economic blocs in the world today. Thus, this paper will provide facts that show reasons for the flourishing of democracy in Spain but its fail of even beginning in Pakistan.
Spain is by far one of the strongest democratic countries in Europe. Its political structure is a mix of two solid countries in the 21st century such as Canada and the United States. Spain’s success in today’s modern world could be traced back to its transition to democracy in 1977. The result was because of the death of the fascist tyrant, General Francisco Franco. The General rose in power during the bloody civil war which took place in 1936-1939 between the Nationalist and the Republicans. He did so with the help of two of the most dangerous leaders to have walked on this earth, Hitler and Mussolini. The Spanish citizens were not always necessarily tormented by tyrants, whose political ideologies only reflected what benefited themselves. From 1931- 1936 , the second republic was formed in Spain where they established a free democratic setting and "For the first time a major breakthrough was made in regional autonomy, indispensable for the development of a stable modern democracy in Spain" 1. Spain currently is a parliamentary representative democratic constitutional monarchy. Its branch of powers is separated in to two, where the executive power lies with the government and the legislative power is delegated to the Spanish parliament. Due to this structure it is very arduous for political figures in states and governments to abuse their power. The executive power in Spain is given to the Council of Minister's, which is led by the Spanish prime minister. The Prime Minister is initially nominated by the king where after he is required to obtain the vote of the lower house of parliament, and finally the king appoints the prime minister. Spain’s legislature is elected...

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