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Treatment Of Messages From Araby By James Joyce

1700 words - 7 pages

In our ever changing and evolving lives, experiences teach us lessons throughout. When new experiences are present there is usually something gained or lost from that certain situation. Although sometimes these lessons aren’t easily recognized; once they come up, they become instilled in our brain. These lessons can plan an important role in the way we act and react to certain things in life. Some experiences can be an eye opener and take us away from something we had been doing which we now know is a bad thing and should get back on the right track. Either that or the experience could be less of a physical thing and more of a mental thing in which we correct ourselves through our thoughts or opinions about certain things. Being in someone else’s shoes for example or in their brain and learning more about that specific person. Some stories can reveal an important moment or experience in a specific characters life. In Araby by James Joyce there is some reference to the blind, “In James Joyce “Araby”, the main protagonist is blinded by his subjective egotism and his inability to separate himself from the nets of his own culture status, overshadowed by English imperialism…it is not until the protagonist undergoes an epiphany—a dramatic but fleeting moment of revelation about self or the world—that he is then able to see the objective from that point of view” (Ryan Sehrer). The main character presented in Araby by James Joyce is blinded by many things in his life: in the end he learns lessons and receives messages; not to over consume, love can be the light, and with age comes experience.
As a consequent of the main character completely consuming him to one young lady, he both loses and gains something through a lesson. His gain is he learned to not solely focus on one thing in life or in the end, when things don’t work out it could hurt the worst. On the positive side the main character lost his innocence within this short story by becoming consumed in physical aspects of a young lady. The author is completely in love with this girl well that’s what his thoughts are anyways even though he has only talked to her in full conversation once and never before. Stated in an article titled Literary Analysis “Araby” by James Joyce, “The unnamed narrator is infatuated with the sister of his friend, Mangan. He hopes to buy a gift for her at the Araby bazaar, which serves to him as an image of escape from the hindering environment of his neighborhood in Dublin. Through the characters and this setting, Joyce communicates the theme that in man’s youthful idealism and his naïve desire, he discovers an opposing disappointment, caused by his immaturity and limitations of the world” (Brandon Thurston). He therefore, is much more interested with the appearance of the girl which he confuses with love. On page 1239 his obsessions with her become apparent, “At night in my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between me and the page I strove to read. The...

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