Tyger By William Blake Essay

2335 words - 9 pages

Poetry is greatly influenced by issues like evil, pain, and human suffering that do not have a literal answer for why they occur. They are often pinpointed by writers as they find its origin or lay the blame through a wide range of poetic devices that cause the reader to question their own beliefs and morals. In the poem ‘Tyger’, William Blake tries to divulge the creation of adversity by asking a series of blatant questions “What immortal hand or eye… frame thy fearful symmetry?” In addition to this, the origin of suffering is again interrogated by William Blake in his poem ‘Poison Tree’, as he explores how unaddressed, cultivated “wrath” can lead to destructive behavior which results in both personal and others misfortune. Both ‘Sonnet 116’ and ‘Valentine’ written by William Shakespeare and Carol Ann Duffy express the side of heartbreak and love that is not often focused upon. These poems incorporate strong feelings about the definition of true love, explaining how love is an “ever fixed mark” and not a “red rose”.  The poem ‘War Photographer’, by Carol Ann Duffy, portrays emotional personal suffering as well as comparing it to the ignorance of others as “Sunday’s supplement”.  ‘Children in the Darkness’ is a poem, written by Henry M. Bechtold that directly addresses human suffering and what can be done to change the suffering people face every day.
William Blake and his poem “The Tyger,” questions human suffering and its creation. Blake uses a tiger as an extended metaphor, which takes on the role of a symbolic character and embodies the spiritual and moral problem that evolves to become the symbolic centre for an investigation about the origin and presence of evil and suffering in the world. The tiger is a dreadful creature which people would not know much about and would fear. Blake uses this image of the tiger as a means to reflect upon a benevolent God. The speaker asks, “Did he who made the Lamb make thee?” (line 20) Through this rhetorical question Blake questions if a benevolent God would create as innocent animal as a lamb and as dreadful an animal as a tiger. William Blake juxtaposes those views of good and evil and the Christian faith is continuously being questioned and Blake sets out to try influence the targeted audience and make them doubt their faith. By doing do, during his time he is challenging the foundation of Christianity and to a great extent the only religion in England.
The second quatrain with some imagery, allusion as well as other rhetorical questions. “In what distant deeps or skies burnt the fire of thing eyes?” (line 6)
By the terms distant deeps or skies, Blake is using an allusion to create a picture of Heaven and Hell. Was evil and human suffering created in a pure, perfect place (heaven) or somewhere which is seen as the manifestation of evil? Granted, Blake continues throughout the whole poem to communicate human suffering by asking about its origin.
Rhetorical questions are used many times, one of which is...

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