This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

U.S History And Government: Landmark Supreme Court Cases.

988 words - 4 pages

Napoleon Bonaparte once said,"History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon." This straightforward quote can be associated to the Supreme Court and their decisions affecting our US History today. Supreme Court decisions become the "law of the land" and, as such have far-reaching consequences for American society. The Court tells us, through their interpretation of the Constitution the meaning of our protections and restrictions. Supreme Court cases have a lot of credence and many Supreme Court cases have had lasting effects on our society today. Two landmark supreme court cases which have an exceptional impact in the present day are Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka and Tinker v. Des Moines School District. These two cases had a great impact on US History and affected our lives forever.Perhaps no other case decided by the Court in the 20th century has had so profound an effect on the social fabric of America as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. The integration of labor unions in the 1930s under the eye of the Fair Employment Practices Commission and the desegregation of the armed forces in 1948 marked major steps toward racial integration. However, the legal framework on which segregation rested was itself being dismantled, challenged repeatedly by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).The doctrine of "separate but equal" was being to crack. However, the 1950's brought a new wave of challenges to official segregation by the NAACP. Linda Brown, an eight-year-old African-American girl had been denied permission to attend an elementary school only five blocks from her home in Topeka, Kansas. Separate elementary schools for whites and nonwhites were maintained by the Board of Education in Topeka. Linda Brown's parents filed a lawsuit to force the schools to admit her to the nearby but segregated, school for white students. The main question addressed to the Court concerned the equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment." Does segregation of children in public schools solely on the basis of race, even though the physical facilities and other 'tangible' factors may be equal, deprive the children of equal educational opportunities?" The Court was asked to determine whether the segregation of schools was unconstitutional. In an unanimous court decision the courts ruled in the favor of Brown (9-0). Chief Justice wrote," Segregation in public education is a denial of the equal protection of the [constitutional] laws...Segregation of white and colored children in public schools has a detrimental effect upon the colored children...A sense of inferiority affects the motivation of a child to learn. Segregation with the sanction of law therefore has a tendency to [retard] the educational and mental development of negro children and deprive them of some of the benefits they would receive in a racial[ly] integrated school..." The court interpreted the issue of...

Find Another Essay On U.S History and Government: Landmark Supreme Court Cases.

Supreme Court Cases on Separation of Church and State Clauses

2424 words - 10 pages connection between God and the good of civilization was destroyed. God is slowly being taken out of classrooms, ceremonies and even sporting events. The entities of Church and State have not been separated, but it does affect many. When debating the subject, it should not matter what religion you are, but how people’s rights are affected. Since the beginning of America, there have been multiple Supreme Court cases in which people, schools and

Supreme Court Cases- McCulloch vs Madison

572 words - 2 pages The landmark case of McCulloch v. Maryland in 1819 unanimously ruled that the Constitution allowed Congress to establish the National Bank. The Court also asserted that the Constitution did not allow a state to tax the Bank. Chief Justice John Marshall stated that the Constitution does not explicitly grant Congress the right to establish a national bank, but also noted that the "necessary and proper" clause of the Constitution gives Congress the

Important Cases Of The Us Supreme Court

731 words - 3 pages Important Cases of the US Supreme Court The United States Supreme Court has interpreted the constitutional guarantees contained in amendments to the constitution. Among these Guaranteed rights are the freedoms of religion, speech, and press, along with the right of protection against illegal search and seizure, equal protection under the law, and the right to counsel. These rights all contained in the first amendment to the constitution are

Supreme Court Cases - Dred Scott vs Sanford

574 words - 2 pages Dred Scott v. Sanford is a popular case in United States History. It set precedence for the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments, the amendments that solely relates to African Americans. Dred Scott, a slave in 1857 declared his right to be free under the Supreme Court. In 1839 Scott and his master moved to Missouri, which was a slave state. Four years later, a U.S. army surgeon named Dr. John Emerson bought Scott and moved him into the free state of

Supreme Court Cases - Gibbons vs. Ogden

548 words - 2 pages competed with Thomas Gibbons in running their steamboat business. They both claimed the waterway between New York and New Jersey was their area of business. Both held two different licenses from the government that granted the same privileges. The state courts ruled out in favor of Ogden and demanded for Gibbons to stop operating his boats in that area. When brought to the Supreme Court, Marshall reversed the decision and granted that the Congress, not

Supreme Court Cases - Marbury vs Madison

649 words - 3 pages constitutionality of he laws it passed. Marshall's opinion in this case removed that power for Congress. By deciding on the constitutionality of the Legislative and the Executive Branch, the Supreme Court is the nation's final authority on the meaning of the Constitution.I believe that the court had made a brilliant decision. It was very clever of John Adams to appoint supporters of his own belief so that they would carry out the law Adams saw fit even if he

U.S. Supreme Court and the Impact of Sentencing

1753 words - 7 pages of these cases were ultimately brought before the Supreme Court of the United States of America for clarification and constitutional application. In a way, this clarification by the Supreme Court was not only a way to guide the probation systems but to standardize the conditions that judges were placing on probationers.In the case of Williams v. New York, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the New York decision that the supposed probation violator does

Supreme Court Cases: The Contrast in the Constitution and Constitutional Law

1177 words - 5 pages This paper discusses the contrast of two landmark United States (U.S.) Supreme Court cases that helped to clearly define how the Fourth and Fifth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution is interpreted, and analyzes the difference between the “Constitution” and “Constitutional Law.” Two cases that are referenced in this analysis are (1) Katz v. United States, 386 U.S. 954 (U.S. March 13, 1967), and (2) Olmstead v. United States, 277 U.S. 438 (U.S

Supreme Court Briefs - Civil Liberties, Cases and the First Amendment of the USA

1672 words - 7 pages Supreme Court Briefs - Civil Liberties The First Amendment gives United States citizens five distinct rights. One of which gives citizens the freedom of assembly. This right gives the individual right to come together and collectively express, promote, pursue and defend the common interest. There has been many Supreme Court cases that have defined this freedom for every citizen and the United States government. Edwards v. State of South

U.S. Supreme Court Graham v. Connor 490 U.S. 386 (1989)

822 words - 4 pages U.S. Supreme Court Graham v. Connor 490 U.S. 386 (1989) Many citizens know their rights. There have been cases where people’s rights have been violated in law enforcement.The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution says, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or

Were the Supreme Court Cases in the 1890's fair?

1462 words - 6 pages During the 1890's the Supreme Court dealt with three important cases that were not fair and really violated human rights. These three cases were the United States vs. E.C. Knight of 1895, Pollock vs. Farmer Loan's & Trust of 1895 and also Plessy Vs. Ferguson of 1896. The results of these cases were very unjust for a few reasons.The first court case that was unfair was U.S. vs E.C. Knight. The E.C. Knight Company with four other companies

Similar Essays

Landmark Supreme Court Cases Essay

1789 words - 8 pages Kelo v. City of New London is a case heard by the Supreme Court involving eminent domain. In 1998, the Pfizer Company constructed a facility in New London, Connecticut and the city saw an opportunity to improve the area around the plant by allowing a private developer to build a commercial facility in the Fort Trumbull neighborhood. In 2000, New London approved the plan and sought to purchase 115 homes in the area to sell to the developer

Criminal Justice And Leading U.S. Supreme Court Cases, Annotated Bibliography

1143 words - 5 pages Annotated Bibliography Champion, D.J. (2009). Leading U.S. supreme court cases in criminal justice: Briefs and key terms. Upper Saddle river, NJ: Prentice Hall. Leading U.S. supreme court cases in criminal justice: Briefs and key terms is a source reference with respect to criminal law, constitutional law, and criminal procedure. The major focus of this book includes explained mandates of over 1000 U.S. Supreme Court cases and this book details

Landmark Supreme Court Decisions Essay

929 words - 4 pages Landmark Supreme Court Decisions      About 32 years ago, in December of 1965, a group of adults and students from Des Moines, Iowa gathered to show their dislike towards American involvement in the Vietnam War. They decided to wear black armbands and fast on December 16 and 31 to express there point. When the principals of the Des Moines School System found out their plans, they decided to suspend anyone

Supreme Court Cases Essay

1211 words - 5 pages landmark case involving Brown and the board of education in Topeka, Kansas was that of a revolution all around the country witch also delt with similar problems and cases. Many children (more specifically black children) were admitted to the school of their choose without any flack now because of this case. The decision of the case reversed the "separate but equal" doctrine.Plessy Vs. Ferguson In the supreme court case Plessy versus Ferguson the