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Understanding Bulimia Essay

852 words - 3 pages

1 Bulimia and Pregnancy Research Essay Alana Graye PSYC3025 November 5th Jennie Girard 2 Bulimia is a worldwide disorder, mostly effecting females. While pregnant it is false that you begin to have maternal instincts on nutrition, many females who suffer from bulimia and become pregnant, tend to stay bulimic. This is a very serious matter towards the fetus and the mother, this essay will take a look at how bulimia effects females while they are pregnant. Pregnant women with bulimia nervosa present interesting practice challenges for dietitians and healthcare professionals due to potential complications of bulimia nervosa for both mothers and fetuses (Morrill, E. S., & Nickols-Richardson, H. 2001). Pregnancy and birth outcomes of women with bulimia nervosa varied among individuals and studies. Maternal outcomes of concern included miscarriages, inappropriate weight gains (excessive or inadequate), complicated deliveries, and resumed and/or continued bulimic behaviors shortly after parturition (Morrill, E. S., & Nickols-Richardson, H. 2001). Fetal complications included low birth weights, prematurity, malformations, and low Apgar scores (Morrill, E. S., & Nickols-Richardson, H. 2001). Screening to detect bulimic behaviors is recommended, as is multidisciplinary treatment of pregnant women with bulimia nervosa to emphasize adequate dietary intakes, promote appropriate weight gains, and help achieve healthy infant outcomes in addition to long-term, healthy eating habits for these women. Future research regarding maternal and fetal outcomes of women with bulimia nervosa during pregnancy, conducted by registered dietitians, is needed to provide greater clarity and understanding of the impact of bulimic behaviors, 3 dietary intakes, and nutritional status during pregnancy on maternal and fetal health (Morrill, E. S., & Nickols-Richardson, H. 2001). Bulimia nervosa in pregnancy has been the subject of several studies. Most studies evaluating the course of eating disorder symptoms during pregnancy have reported a substantial improvement in bulimic symptoms and, in the majority of cases, a return to pre-pregnancy symptom levels or even a worsening of symptoms in the postpartum period (Conrad, R., Schablewski, J., Schilling, G., & Liedtke, R. 2003). However, the reasons for improvement of bulimic symptoms during pregnancy are not fully understood. Morgan and colleagues reported on 94 women for whom phenomenological descriptions of pregnancy suggested an alleviation of a sense of responsibility for body weight and shape (Conrad, R., Schablewski, J., Schilling, G., & Liedtke, R. 2003). Furthermore, physiological changes in the course of pregnancy, such as changes in taste and smell and changes in satiety associated with an altered leptin level, may have important influences on feeding behavior. Even more important than understanding improvement...

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