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Understanding Bulimia As A Disease Essay

702 words - 3 pages

Get rochelle’s story In order to understand bulimia as a disease, one must know what it is, the affects that it has on the victim and their family, and what treatments are available.
What is bulimia? Bulimia is an eating disorder characterized by frequent episodes of binge eating followed by frantic efforts to avoid gaining weight (1). Other common names for bulimia include: bulimia nervosa and binging and purging (3). A person with bulimia starts out by trying to diet. The stricter the diet, the more obsessed a person could become with food. When someone starves themselves, their body responds with cravings. After a while, some tend to give in to those cravings. After a person gives in ...view middle of the document...

Others include going to the bathroom after meals, using laxatives, smelling of vomit, and excessive exercises. There are physical signs as well. Some of these are calluses or scars on hands or knuckles, having puffy “chipmunk” cheeks, discolored teeth, and frequent weight fluctuations (1).
In truth, many things can be the cause of bulimia. Culture, family, life changes, stressful events, personality traits, and biology can all be the effect of bulimia. With culture, people are often seeing images of flawless, thin people that it makes it hard for people to feel good about their bodies. If you have someone in your family that has bulimia, then you are most likely going to be affected. Traumatic or stressful events can also lead to bulimia. With certain personality traits, a person with bulimia may not like him or herself, hate the way he or she looks, feels hopeless or moody or having a hard time controlling impulsive behavior. Also, genes, hormones, and chemicals in the brain may develop bulimia. (2). There are also many complications of bulimia. Some include weight gain, abdominal pain, bloating, swelling...

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