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Unexpected Realizations In The Dubliners By James Joyce

910 words - 4 pages

James Joyce incorporates many things into his short stories in The Dubliners, whether that is religion, alcohol, women’s issues, relationships or epiphany. Most of these things have a way of coming back to reflect different points in his life. Each story has a way of portraying one, if not more of these subjects. Sometimes relationships can lead to many emotions and sometimes unexpected things happen. You can say these unexpected things can cause someone to experience and epiphany, which can be defined as a sudden or striking realization. A day of hooky of finally talking to a crush may seem like a great idea, but when ideas turn into actions the results are not always wanted. And it is then ...view middle of the document...

He was so intrigued by this girl he hardly knew. The boy is so shocked from their conversation and then decides that he will bring her back a gift from the bazaar. In his mind, buying her a gift will assure him another conversation with this girl. This gives the boy hope that maybe something could spark between the two. During this time, it begins to show the boys feelings for her and gives a sense that something could happen after the fair. He his so mesmerized by this girl that it’s difficult to think that something won’t spark between the two.
Young boys normally have huge imaginations and are willing to break the rules to have fun. In “An Encounter” by James Joyce, the boys “disrupt their identity as a subject of school by desiring adventure and escape from another layer of civil society which is instrumental in colonizing desire and limiting freedom” (Murphy 15). The three boys enjoy letting their imagination run wild as they play cowboys and Indians in the evenings after school. “The adventures related in the literature of the Wild West were so remote from the narrator’s nature he explains that it still open doors of escape” (Murphy 12). Even though some did not enjoy playing such game, their sense of adventure never faded. There were times when their sense of adventure found its way into the classroom. Father Butler had to stop one of the boys from reading the halfpenny marvel instead of his Roman history book. The priest and teacher reacted in a way...

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