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Uniforms And Freedom Of Expression Essay

1256 words - 5 pages

Does wearing a school uniform really make a difference in the learningprocess? Ever wonder what is the purpose of wearing a school uniform in thefirst place? If all of the students are dressed alike, it seems like it would bepretty tough to express your freedom of expression through attire. Manystudents, parents, and administrators have different opinions on the strictenforcement of a wearing school uniform. Some religious students might notbe allowed to wear a certain color of clothing, or can could only wear onecertain kind of clothing, etc. A lot of students nowadays are obligated towear a school uniform without a choice or even without a say. Whether it isa religious conflict, interfering in the learning process, I believe schooluniforms cause conflicts in many ways. I will discuss the reasons whyschools are putting out these rules to make school uniforms a mandatorydress code.The schools in the United States teach the students thatour country is a free one. This does not make much sense when schools aretrying to enforce a rule where all the students are supposed to dress alike.How are students supposed to have personal freedom of choice whenhaving a standard dress code inhibits their chance? When it comes tosafety, schools are always strict. A School uniform plays a vital role inthe safety of the student body. After the Columbine High School shootingthat took place on April 20th, 1999 in Columbine, Colorado, schools startedit get a lot stricter on dress codes. Littleton, Colorado held a survey wherethree quarters of four thousand nineteen locals rejected the school district'snew dress code because it seemed unfair to them. The code would ban hats,camouflage, shorts, skirts more than three inches above the knee, and pantswith a waist size that is more than two inches greater than the studentsactual waist." A school uniform policy inhibits a student's freedom of choice. Schools teach students that our country is a free one. But when school boards make students wear what they tell them too-- it curtails the students' freedom " (Ezine Articles) .In California some school districts have a dress code as a part of theirschool safety plan that prohibits pupils from wearing gang-related apparel.The "gang-related apparel" includes things such as baggy pants,shirts that were two sizes too big or bigger, different colored bandanas, andother things like certain bracelets or chain necklaces that did not seemappropriate. California was the first state that had a school district makeschool uniforms a widespread mandatory uniform policy in public schools.The California school district believes that there were many potentialbenefits such as decreasing violence and theft because of the clothing andshoes, helping the school recognize who does and does not belong in theschool, reducing student distractions, and instilling a sense of community"Reducing ways in which gang members can identify themselves which, in essence, is a form of intimidation and creates...

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