Unique Cultures In Arundhati Roy’s The God Of Small Things And Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

1995 words - 8 pages

Unique Cultures in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart
 
 
There are a variety of cultures in this world and each culture is unique. Usually when one was born and raised in a certain culture, that person may adapt to that culture for a period of time. It is sometimes difficult to look into someone else’s culture, and understand their culture. Sometimes one must keep an open mind, study the culture, or live in another culture to understand the culture. When reading “The God of Small Things” by Arundhati Roy, and “Things Fall Apart“, by Chinua Achebe one must look beyond their culture to understand how others live in a different culture. When I read Roy’s novel, I did not get a great understanding of the novel, because it was difficult to follow. I did not know a lot about the culture before I read novel. Both text discusses a particular cultural group, and as the narrator tells the story the narrator intertwines the cultural elements with the actual story being told. The differences between the text were the way the text was structured, and how the stories were told. Also, both texts contained different religions practiced by the particular cultural group.

In “The God of Small Things“, and “Things Fall Apart” both consist a particular cultural groups. In “The God of Small Things“, the people in the story were Pakistan Indian. The way Roy described the setting in the story, and how the people looked gave an idea of where the story took place. Plus she also mentioned some cities that are in India. Roy described the rivers as being unclean, but people would cleanse themselves in the river. The women wore saris. The immediate families and extended families seemed to live together also. In “The God of Small Things”, the mother, children, aunt and uncle lived together. In “The God of Small Things” the characters were Rahel and Estha, who were fraternal twins. The twin’s mother, Baby Kochamma, Kochu Maria, and Chacko lived together. This family stuck together through good and bad times throughout this book. If something happened to one of the family members, the whole family was there for each other for love and support.

For example, the twin’s mother left their father, because he was an abusive alcoholic. She took her twins with her to live with Baby Kochamma and Chacko. Together they raised the twins.

In “Things Fall Apart“, the characters were of an African clan. The clan consists of husbands with wives. The men had children from each wife. Women and daughter would serve the father food, and whatever he ordered them to do. The sons would not do much service. They would listen to the father tell them stories, to teach the sons how to be a strong man when they grow up. The men would teach the sons that women were not intelligent.

For example, in “Things Fall Apart“, the characters were Okwonkwo, his wives and children. There were also some other members of the clan in the story. Okwonkwo was...

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