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United States V Jones Essay

577 words - 3 pages

Citation: United States v Jones/ United States courts of Appeals/ District of Columbia, 2012/132 S. Ct. 945
Facts: In 2004, the FBI initiated an investigation on Jones and other associates for a possible drug trafficking. During the investigation FBI agents obtained a warrant authorizing them to install a Global Positioning System tracking device on a Jeep, Jones used regularly. The warrant allowed agent to install the tracking device within 10th days of its issue but agents did not install the device until the 11th day. The GPS gave the FBI information regarding the Jeep’s and Jones every movement and based on the information provided agents determined that drug trafficking activity was present. Eventually it secured an indictment of jones and others for drug trafficking conspiracy charges, although the District court suppressed the GPS date obtained while the jeep was in Jones curtilage of the home they held that other date obtained outside in the public areas was admissible as jones had no reasonable expectation of privacy. The Distinct court reversed and held that admission of evidence obtained by a warrantless use of GPS device violated the 4th amendment.
Issue: Whether the installment of a GPS tracking system on an individual’s vehicle that is used to monitor his vehicle movements constitutes as a search or seizure under the fourth amendment.
Decision: Yes. Held: That government’s attachment of the GPS device on a vehicle that is used to monitor a vehicles movement constitutes a search under the 4th amendment.
Reason: Majority Opinion Justice Scalia delivered the opinion of the court. The court affirmed with the lower courts and held majority that the physical occupation of any private property for obtaining information purposes would be considered a search within...

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