Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle". Essay

670 words - 3 pages

Dreams are optimistic and desirable and can come in many forms, such as a vision, an inspiration, or even a promise from someone. Jurgis Rudkus envisioned a promise of prosperity guaranteed by the capitalist regime, but the prosperity visualized was only that of a mirage. Sinclair uses Jurgis' unfulfilled dreams to point out the evil deceptions and deceits practiced by capitalism.The first run in that Jurgis has with the capitalists "wolves" starts with the purchase of a "new" home. The naïve Lithuanian family buys a home without knowing any of the details that come along with the purchase of a home. The real estate agent, personifying capitalism, cons the family into believing they can actually own the so-called new home. "In the first place as to the house they had bought, it was not new at all, as they had supposed; it was about fifteen years old, and there was nothing new upon it but the paint...The house was one of a whole row that was built by a company which existed to make money by swindling poor people." (Sinclair, 81) This fateful event begins a dominoe effect of struggles, and the deterioration of Jurgis' dream.Capitalism controlled every aspect of Jurgis' family and life. " The whole of society is in their grip, the whole labor of the world lies at their mercy-and like fierce wolves they rend and destroy, like ravening vultures they devour and tear" (Sinclair, 364). The packers made it impossible for even the children to go to school and be educated. The low wages obliged the children to work in order for survival. Sinclair illustrates how capitalism snares all of its laborers into its will and its ways, never for this laboring class to become prosperous or educated but only to remain a device for profit.Times only got worst for Jurgis. The capitalist society not only controlled his economic state but also his love life. Jurgis' love life is intruded upon when he finds out that...

Find Another Essay On Upton Sinclair's "The jungle".

What was the outcome of Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle"?

1945 words - 8 pages fear. Consumers were not aware of the actual ingredients within the canned meat, surprisingly everything but the actually meat was processed. The Food and Drug Act protects consumers from what Upton Sinclair's novel entailed, restoring faith among America's meat-packing industry.Bibliography1)Sinclair, Upton. The Jungle. New York: Barnes and Noble Books, 19952)"Cattle Roof Gardens In Cleanly", New York Times, Vol. LV...No. 17,660, 1 June 1906, 1-23

A Comparison of the Legacy of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring

1701 words - 7 pages 1906 would see the publication of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, pushing through major reforms of the meatpacking industry and eventually causing the government to take actions to protect the health of its people; almost fifty years later, the publication of Rachel Carson's novel Silent Spring would invoke a similar, but changed response to the threat of DDT. Although both would lead to government legislation creating major changes

Book Report on Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" - Georgia Southern University, US Comp - Book Report

1483 words - 6 pages Brandon Sellers Downs Honors US Comp November 30, 2017 Book Review of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle The Jungle is a highly provocative, concerning, dark, and gruesomely vivid story about a family of Lithuanian immigrants who try to make a better living for themselves working in the meatpacking industry of “Packingtown,” Chicago. The main character, Jurgis, tries desperately to bring wealth and happiness to his family in a place that he was told

"The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair

1341 words - 5 pages Upton Sinclair. The Jungle. New York: Signet Classic. 1960.The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a novel set in Packingtown, the meatpacking sector of Chicago. The time is set in the beginning of the twentieth century. Upton Sinclair tells the story of an immigrant named Jurgis and his family that come to America in search of wealth and the good life that they hear so much about. They believe so much in the American dream. However, life in America

"The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair

1328 words - 5 pages Thematic essay on "The Jungle"Basicly describes the capitalistic ways of governenment during the progressive area manifested into the meat packing section of Chicago. Vividly describes the hardships of imigrants in the early 1900's. What is the theme of The Jungle? What is Upton Sinclair's purpose behind this book?Title: The JungleAuthor: Upton SinclairThe Jungle as named by Upton Sinclair is an interesting story, describing the hardships

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

1118 words - 4 pages Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle with an unabashed message in mind. Using his powerful descriptions of the repugnance of the meat packing industry as his vehicle, Sinclair conveyed his position of socialism and lamented the plight of the working-man.The Jungle's main character, Jurgis Rudkus, immigrates with his family to America from Lithuania with hopes of living the "American Dream". Instead, their dream is torn apart by the dreadful cruelties

The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair

820 words - 4 pages The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, became an instant classic in 1906, and has become possibly one of the most referenced books in history and political science classrooms all over the United States, according to Dustin LaBarge (LaBarge para.1). Sinclair’s novel has generated worldwide awareness of the repulsive meat-packing industry. I found the book intriguing, because of the detail that was added in to make sure nothing was left out. There were

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

1593 words - 7 pages What are the major issues Sinclair addresses in The Jungle? The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a vivid account of life for the working class in the early 1900s. Jurgis Rudkus and his family travel to the United States in search of the American dream and an escape from the rigid social structure of Lithuania. Instead, they find a myriad of new difficulties. Sinclair attributes their problems to the downfalls of capitalism in the United States

The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair

1096 words - 4 pages Do you believe this novel has any significance for anyone living in 2011? I strongly believe this novel, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, is highly significant for anyone living in 2011 because these problems are still existent within our society and many others as well. This novel discusses problems that are crucial not only to our country but to other countries that view the United States as a place of prosperity and success. Throughout the

Modern Day Relevance of Sinclair's The Jungle

917 words - 4 pages widely prescribed example of this struggle is Upton Sinclair's groundbreaking novel, The Jungle. The Jungle takes the reader along on a journey with a group of recent Lithuanian immigrants to America. As well as a physical journey, this is a journey into a new world for them. They have come to America, where in the early twentieth century it was said that any man willing to work an honest day, would make a living and could support his family. It

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair; book review

451 words - 2 pages The JungleBy: Upton Sinclair The Jungle, written by Upton Sinclair in 1906, enlightens the reader about Socialism as a remedy for the evils of capitalism; the immigrant experience and the hollowness of the American Dream. The third-person narrator focuses on what the main character, Jurgis Rudkus, and what he feels, learns, and experiences. Sinclair also shows the social values that affect his characters lives in the past and future, but

Similar Essays

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle Essay

1142 words - 5 pages Upton Sinclair's The Jungle Jurgis Rudkus and Ona Lukoszaite open the novel of The Jungle with a celebration of their wedding. The opening of the book highlights the best time that Jurgis and Ona will ever again experience during their stay in America. Jurgis is convinced that he can accomplish the American Dream, gaining prosperity from hard work and dedication. However, as the novel progresses, we soon see that this dream that Jurgis had

Quick Review Of Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle"

1168 words - 5 pages Upton Sinclair's The Jungle is a very powerful piece of literature devoted to shaking the corrupt foundations of the meat packing industries of Chicago during the turn of the century. Sinclair's purpose is clear: to expose the truth about the filthy ways of the city's establishments and to deliver justice to the common workingman. In order to achieve his desired goal, Sinclair incorporates the use of a fictional, immigrant family in the

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle As Socialist Propaganda

3353 words - 13 pages The Jungle as Socialist Propaganda   In the world of economic competition that we live in today, many thrive and many are left to dig through trashcans. It has been a constant struggle throughout the modern history of society. One widely prescribed example of this struggle is Upton Sinclair's groundbreaking novel, The Jungle. The Jungle takes the reader along on a journey with a group of recent Lithuanian immigrants to America

Critical Analysis Of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle

2341 words - 9 pages      The Jungle is a novel that focuses on a family of immigrants who came to America looking for a better life. The novel was written by Upton Sinclair, who went into the Chicago stockyards to investigate what life was like for the people who worked there. The book was originally written with the intent of showing Socialism as a better option than Capitalism for the society. However, the details of the story ended up launching a government