Urbanization Trends Essay

527 words - 3 pages

Urbanization TrendsWhen an American thinks of an urbanized area they think of lots of people, tall buildings, permanent houses, paved streets and sidewalks, water and sewage systems and so forth. This may be the case in middle class urban areas; however, urbanized areas in the poorest countries of the world are quite different. Africa, one of the poorest countries, suffers from a shortage of infrastructure causing slum-like conditions in urban areas. According to White D. (2006) "Almost 72 per cent of its urban residents, it calculates, are in slums". Because there is no clear legal basis for building housing areas are not permanent. Streets and alleys are made of compacted refuse. There is no city ...view middle of the document...

Zimbabwe's rapid urbanization has caused rapid population growth which causes high demand for services such as food, shelter, medical care et cetera. The economy is staggering under the demands and left with limited recourses to address the needs of the city. Many have to live in substandard housing. Warah, R. (2005) "According to UNHABITAT, more than 70 per cent of the urban population in sub-Saharan Africa lives in slum-like conditions, with little access to basic services, and in inadequate or overcrowded housing. The government finally became involved in 2005. According to Warah, R. (2005)… In May 2005 the government began demolishing homes, business premises and vending sites in several parts of the country that were considered substandard. An estimated 700,000 people lost either their homes or source of livelihood, or both, as a result of the operation, and a further 2.4 million suffered indirect affects. In light of these facts, one might gather that Zimbabwe may be in the state of national disaster.ReferencesWarah, R. (2005). CHAOTIC URBAN TRANSITION IN AFRICA. UN Chronicle Vol. 42 Issue 3, p30-31, 2p. Retrieved October 5, 2007, from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=4&hid=2&sid=04db50e4-6e8b-4743-9a1b-ce114fe0fb21%40sessionmgr2White D. (2006). A pressing concern URBAN DEVELOPMENT: Almost 72 per cent of Africa's urban residents live in slums, writes David White: [SURVEYS EDITION]. Financial Times, p. 5. Retrieved October 4, 2007, from http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.apollolibrary.com/pqdweb?index=3&did=1166193051&SrchMode=1&sid=1&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1191646036&clientId=13118

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