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United States And Immigration Essay

1493 words - 6 pages

Issue:

The United States’ future is at a risk to miss an opportunity to increase the labor force due to political stalemate. Currently in the United States over 11 million undocumented immigrants are living in hiding. Most of them want to legally work. The reality is the current law is inefficient and weak to deter migrants who know the U.S. has a demand for skilled and unskilled labor. Likewise, the lack of U.S.-Mexico border security and relaxed law enforcement for overstayed visa traveler has rewarded bad behavior by luring illegal entry. This memorandum describes motives to adopt a major immigration policy change that promotes security, freedom, prosperity and conduit to citizenship for immigrants already in the U.S., and in the long run provide positive microeconomic impact.

Background:

In 2006 the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act was established to prevent illegal border crossing, improve law enforcement and provides legal immigrant status for the 11-million immigrants who already live in the U.S. Unfortunately, this and the Senate’s bipartisan Immigration Reform Bill passed in 2013 were not amended into law. The paralysis to adopt this policy change may be due to uncertain future cost and political polarization. Further, one could argue another reason is because the United States democratic system works hard to provide the best practical problem solving policy that benefits the greater good. But despite the U.S. democratic system analysis, it is long overdue to reform the law and now it’s time to change it.

The Pew Research Center (Pew) estimated that between years 2000 to 2010 the number of undocumented immigrants increased from 8.4 to 11.2 million. That’s a 75% illegal entry increase in just one decade. Further, the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) gathered immigration statistical data from the Department of Homeland Security and found that “America’s illegal population is made up of visa overstay—their estimates range from 27 to 57%...” The cost of status quo creates an economical burden and it does not provide any benefit to the nation. In fact, CIS discovered that over half of immigrants who are low income and on behalf of their U.S.-born children (under 18-year), use welfare programs. The CIS study shows that just for 2008 legal and illegal immigrants used welfare programs totaling $517 billion. This negatively impacts the U.S. budget. Taxes are not collected from illegal immigrants and it’s not because they are not willing to pay, it’s because they do not have legal status to get a Social Security Card. The past five years the U.S. has been under stagnant economic conditions and record high debt, therefore we cannot afford to continue to pay for welfare programs without any returns on investment. It’s obvious that a major immigration law change is needed. The Pew Research estimates that 75% of the nation’s population says we need to make a major immigration change. The reformed law should be sensible to the economy...

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