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Use Of Propaganda To Spread Anti Semitism In Nazi Germany During The 1930’s And 1940’s

2473 words - 10 pages

“All propaganda has to be popular and has to accommodate itself to the comprehension of the least intelligent of those whom it seeks to reach,” Adolf Hitler (The National World War Museum). The German Nazi dictator utilized his power over the people using propaganda, eventually creating a sense of hatred towards Jews. After World War 1, the punishments of the League of Nations caused Germany to suffer. The Nazi party came to blame the Jews in order to have a nation-wide “scapegoat”. This hatred and prejudice towards Jews is known as anti-semitism. According to the Breman Museum, “the Nazi Party was one of the first political movements to take full advantage of mass communications technologies: radio, recorded sound, film, and the printed word” (The Breman Museum). By publishing books, releasing movies and holding campaigns against Jews, antisemitism came to grow quickly, spreading all across Germany. The Nazi Party often referred to the notion of a “People’s Community” where all of Germany was “racially pure” (Issuu). They would show images of ‘pure’, blond workers, labouring to build a new society. This appealed greatly to people who were demoralized during Germany’s defeat in World War 1 and the economic depression of the 1920’s and 1930’s. Hitler, along with Joseph Goebbels, used developed propaganda methods in order to suppress the Jews and spread anti semitism.

Anti-semitism originates back to the Middle Ages, when Christians believed that Jews were responsible for the death of Jesus. They were also accused of the ritual murder of Christian children in what were called blood libels. The main idea of racial anti-semitism was developed and presented by a philosophist named Joseph Arthur de Gobineau, explaining that the Jewish race was inferior to any other (Princeton University). After the events of World War 1 and the punishments of the League of Nations, an international association to keep peace among nations, Germany suffered greatly. The Treaty of Versailles was an agreement declared on June 28, 1919 between the Allied Powers and Germany. Germany lost territory, including their African territories, as well as 700,000 square kilometers, all of which were given to the League of Nations (McDougal Littell). Additionally, Germany was restricted on their military size and power. The Rhineland was made into a demilitarized zone, and they had to pay reparations; the cost of repairing war damage. Although they did not want to sign the treaty, the Allies threatened to invade if they didn't. The most brutal agreement, however, was that Germany was obliged to sign War Guilt Clause, Article 231, where they were to be blamed for starting World War 1. This angered the Germans, but they were inevitably forced to sign. When Hitler and the Nazis grew as a political group, they claimed Jews responsible for losing World War 1 as well as for the economic crisis (McDougal Littell). Many German people believed in the Nazi claims that Jews were responsible...

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