This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Futile Search For Identity In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

1919 words - 8 pages

Futile Search for Identity in Jane Eyre

 
   According to the university psychology department, "The human brain is most emotionally affected in childhood." As a child, many experience numerous great events, however one negative event can undermine all of the great events that the brain would have remembered. The traumatizing occurrences that take place in people's lives are catastrophic in childhood, and have a long lasting effect in adulthood. These events can cause a lack of love being provided, and not provide the experiences essential for adult relationships. In Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Jane's childhood lacks love and the experiences necessary in order to maintain healthy relationships, therefore causing her to go on a search for her identity.  

 

Because of the abuse imposed upon Jane, she created a sense of independence and dignity. In Jane's early years as a child in Gateshead she was abused both verbally and physically. While Jane resided in Gateshead she was abused physically by John Reed (8). However, the physical abuse is nominal when juxtaposed to the verbal abuse that caused emotional scarring for years to come. Jane was told that she was merely a poor child that was graciously taken in by her dear aunt. However, it was clear that when Mrs. Reed has Jane locked in the Red Room after John Reed attacked her (9) that her intentions really weren't respectable. Further Jane was told by Bessie, "No; you are less than a servant, for you do nothing for your keep." (9). This cynical treatment would prove to be very influential in Jane's later life. The independence and dignity that Jane goes on to acquire would clearly stand in the way of her future relationships. She illustrates the commencement of a new boldness and independence when she articulates, "I resisted all the way: a new thing for me, and a circumstance which greatly strengthened the bad opinion Bessie and Miss abbot were disposed to entertain of me." (9). The implications of this quote prove that Jane's independence is more of a stubbornness than a independence.  Moreover, she proclaims that this boldness further solidified the hate toward her, but she was going to continue to quarrel. The effects of this were later seen as an adult at Thornfield Hall. When Jane discovers that Mr. Rochester was really married to Bertha, Jane thinks to herself, "`Who in the world cares for you? or who will be injured by what you do?' Still indomitable was the reply-- `I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself.'" (270). This is a mere déjà vu of the experience with the Red Room, because both times something horrific was happening to Jane, and both times she dealt with it by respecting herself, or so it seems. Internally, Jane was merely being an immature stubborn girl. For Jane understood that Mr. Rochester loved her, but she decided to be inflexible, and wouldn't...

Find Another Essay On Futile Search for Identity in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

A Plea for Help in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

1602 words - 6 pages      Many people believe that eating disorders are a product of the twentieth century, brought on by teenage girls aspiring to be supermodels like Cindy Crawford. Although such pressures are precipitating factors to many eating disorders, doctors diagnosed patients with anorexia as early as 1689 (Spignesi 7). One early example of anorexia is present in the novel Jane Eyre. Written in the mid-nineteenth century by Charlotte Brontë, this book

Cold Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

3165 words - 13 pages Cold Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Cold imagery is everywhere in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. There are various forms of cold imagery found in each character's personality and life experiences. Cold images take on various forms, such as Jane's descriptions of pictures in a book displaying the Arctic, and figurative language including ice, water, rain, and sleet. The descriptive imagery of coldness symbolizes both the repression of

Radical Ideas in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

2091 words - 8 pages Radical Ideas in Jane Eyre          Charlotte Bronte knew what she was doing when she assumed the pseudonym of Currer Bell. In Jane Eyre she wanted to pose radical ideas regarding the role of women in the 19th century, but being a sensible woman, she knew that society would never accept having a woman pose these new views. It would be altogether too logical and self-praising. Though the author was never credited for the published

Sexism Exposed in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

1490 words - 6 pages to the social upheaval, writing personal, subjective novels.   Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre, published in 1847, is an archetype of the 1840s novel.  It tells the story of Jane Eyre, an orphan who eventually finds herself and happiness as a governess and, later, a wife.  Although this is a "personal" story that provides escape and entertainment for its readers, Jane Eyre most certainly, if sometimes subtly, deals with a number of

Women Oppressed in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

1695 words - 7 pages education, the workforce, politics and other wide-scale arenas than do women.  In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, Jane is an example of a woman oppressed, yet she finds ways to break free of that which confines her.  The family structure and our school systems are two of the first places children learn about themselves.  If they do not grant equal opportunity for men and women, it will be impossible to create a just and gender-equal society

Suffering in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

879 words - 4 pages of the suicide of Rochester's crazy wife, Bertha Mason, he can now marry Jane. They then wed and have a child. The child is a reward to Jane for her enduring life of sorrow and stoicism. Jane finally finds true happiness. Through these events at Thornfield, Jane gains independence, wealth, and is rewarded a child.      Jane is seen, in Charolette Bronte's Jane Erye, as a stoic character who endures through the worst of

The Self-confidence of Jane in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

642 words - 3 pages the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane shows self-confidence throughout the novel, by possessing a sense of self-worth, dignity, and a trust in God.     At the beginning of the novel while Jane is living under her aunt, Mrs. Reed, she is treated disrespectfully and cruelly.  She accuses Jane of being deceitful and a troublesome girl in front of Mr. Brocklehurst, the master of Lowood School.  Jane is so

Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre: Jane Eyre's Artwork

1844 words - 7 pages Ingram that precedes their meeting, her unconscious pencil sketch of Rochester during her return to Gateshead, Rosamund Oliver's request for a portrait at Morton, and St. John's viewing of her work, which leads to the discovery of her identity near the end of the novel. These scenes occur throughout the novel, giving her art a prominence in the story, and there are also several references to her unique artistic ability.   When Jane

The Maturity of Jane Eyre in Charlotte Bronte's Novel

2584 words - 10 pages JANE EYRE Bloom’s Notes. Broomall: Chelsea House Publishers, 1996. Print. Cody, David. “Charlotte Bronte: A Brief Biography.” Charlotte Bronte: A Brief Biography. Hartwick College, 1987. Web. http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/bronte/cbronte/brontbio.html Dooley, Deborah A. "Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre.." Literary Contexts In Novels: Charlotte Bronte’s 'Jane Eyre' (2006): 1-11. Literary Reference Center. Web. 03 Feb. 2014. http

Role of Faith in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

778 words - 3 pages The Role of Faith in Jane Eyre       In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte's inspirational novel, religion is embraced through a series of spiritual explorations. Bronte portrays Jane's character and zest for religion by revealing Jane's transitions from Gateshead to Lowood, Lowood to Thornfield, and Thornfield to Moor House. Each location plays a significant role in the development of Jane's perspective on religion. Jane struggles to

The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

978 words - 4 pages The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre      In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë clearly demonstrates the relationship between sexuality and morality in Victorian society through the character of Bertha Mason, the daughter of a West Indian planter and Rochester's first wife. Rochester recklessly married Bertha in his youth, and when it was discovered shortly after the marriage that Bertha was sexually promiscuous, Rochester

Similar Essays

Sympathy For Jane Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

1615 words - 6 pages Sympathy for Jane Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre In the first two chapters of Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte creates sympathy for Jane from the settings she uses like the red room, which comes up later in chapter two. Also with all the metaphors of Janes true feelings under the surface and the ways that the chapters are structured. Charlotte Bronte starts off the book straight to the point as if we just enter Janes mind at this moment in

Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" Essay

3679 words - 15 pages Helen's absolute, selfless faith. Jane "does not follow a particular doctrine, but she is sincerely religious in a nondoctrinaire way" ("Jane Eyre" 170).Another theme of Jane Eyre is the search for home and family, which is also closely associated with search for identity. Throughout the novel, Jane searches for kinship, a sense of place in a relationship characterized by "fellow-feeling," a term Jane uses repeatedly. According to Lamonica, "the

Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Essay

1547 words - 6 pages Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Jane Eyre was written in 1847 by Charlotte Brontë. Clearly the context in which an author writes will have a profound effect on the portrayal of society. Jane Eyre was written to reflect a contemporary view of the way young women's lives could be affected, if they were unfortunate enough to be born without money. Middle-class women without income had very few options open to them

Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Essay

1114 words - 4 pages The Dangers of Secrets In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, the characters come to learn that secrets do more harm than good through Edward Rochester’s secrecy after the fire in his room, Mrs. Reed not telling her about the letter from her uncle, and Edward Rochester’s secret marriage with Bertha. First, Rochester, who really knows what happened during the fire in his room, refuses to tell Jane the full truth so as to not hurt her. Secondly, Mrs