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Using Chapter Nineteen In Pride And Prejudice, As A Starting Point Discuss How Jane Austen Uses Dramatic Incidents To Engage The Reader

692 words - 3 pages

Austen uses dramatic incidents within the novel to create a sense of tension and to make it more interesting for the reader. Austen tends to use dramatic incidences between two characters (such as Mr. Collins and Elizabeth) and at unexpected points during the story. She also uses dramatic incidents when the situation is slightly predictable, even though they are at unexpected times. Austen uses irony from the narrator and sometimes the characters so we can enjoy the situation.In chapter nineteen Austen establishes an unexpected d dramatic incident, she introduces Mr. Collin's being proud and smug. He asks Elizabeth to join him in another room; we know that he had previously spoken to Mrs. Bennet about marrying Elizabeth. Mr. Collins is expecting to marry Elizabeth and therefore in this chapter he tells her."Almost as soon as I entered the house, I singled you outas the companion of my future life."We know that Mr. Collins is very friendly Lady Catherine de Bourgh, who has told him he must marry, therefore this is his reason for visiting Longbourn. His first choice of wife, Jane was unavailable due to her relations with Mr. Bingley.During Mr. Collins and Elizabeth's meeting, we hear how Mr. Collins feels that Elizabeth would marry him and be happy about this. Even though Elizabeth kindly rejects this proposal we hear how Mr. Collins thinks she is still willing."I must therefore conclude that you are not serious inyour rejection of me, I shall choose to attribute it to yourwish of increasing my love by suspense, according to theusual practise of elegant females."Elizabeth is increasingly frustrated by this and her reply shows her annoyance at the ignorance of Mr. Collins and his views on young women."I do assure you sir that I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man."The way in which Mr. Collins expects Elizabeth to accept the proposal is comical....

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