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Using Marxist Theory In The Doll's House By Henrik Ibsen

1191 words - 5 pages

“Greed is the root of all evil.” A quote from the Bible that describes many plays and stories. The Marxist theory uses a similar outlook on that saying, but it does not convey the message that the quote does. Using the Marxist theory, good can still be done though it typically isn’t. “A Doll’s House” is the perfect example of this theory, and the quote. Its narrative is almost wholly centered on economic status and money. The characters like Nora, Ms. Linde, and Krogstad are primarily main characters because of the money issues they have got themselves stuck into. It leads their actions till the very end of the play up until some of the characters realized that money was controlling ...view middle of the document...

Torvald refuses to comply with her/his demands and blows the whole issue off. Nora cannot think of a way out of the problem so she contemplates committing suicide. At this point in the play a loan has turned into a life threating debt that cannot be paid. Money continues to drive the plot but in a less narrow minded way than before. The string of debt has now been strung into a web that can’t be undone. Later in the play Nora realizes that money has only been swaying her of her ignorance involving Torvald. She understands that money isn’t the only reason to be with someone and then her story ends. Money has had control over the entire plot up until the very end when she denied the Marxist Theory.
Marrying someone for their money is a huge sign of the Marxists Theory. The character known as Kristine or Mrs. Linde is guilty of this notion. Her family was in need and she had no way to provide for them, this led to her marrying a businessman to obtain an economic gain for all those that she cared about. She also is lunged into the plot because she is looking for a job which brings along with it money. She only did this because her two previous sources of income had fallen right under her. The businessman she was married to and her business that she had both collapsed. She would not have been in the plot if she wasn’t controlled by her limited economic situation that she was in. Before the play’s plot it was shown that she had left Krogstad because of his “hopeless prospects”. This quote could be taken in many ways but the most relevant idea to the plot would be that he simply had no goals, future, or a stable source of money that Mrs. Linde could rely on to support her family. In the end she found the same fate as Nora. Money is not all that it’s cracked up to be, true happiness must always come first. When reuniting with Krogstad, another money torn character, after leaving him to help her family she admitted that all she really wants to be a mother and wife to his children and him respectively. The power that money had on her held her in its grip till the end, swaying all of her decisions over what felt natural and just.
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