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Utilitarianism And Morality In John Stuart Mill´S Essay

1190 words - 5 pages

For more than two thousand years, the human race has struggled to effectively establish the basis of morality. Society has made little progress distinguishing between morally right and wrong. Even the most intellectual minds fail to distinguish the underlying principles of morality. A consensus on morality is far from being reached. The struggle to create a basis has created a vigorous warfare, bursting with disagreement and disputation. Despite the lack of understanding, John Stuart Mill confidently believes that truths can still have meaning even if society struggles to understand its principles. Mill does an outstanding job at depicting morality and for that the entire essay is a ...view middle of the document...

Abortion, the process by which the fetus is removed, lies where in the distinction in morality? In all fifty states, women have the legal right to obtain an abortion, but is it murder? I believe that the entire process of abortion is outrageous and disgusting, though I do defend that it should be the woman’s choice. Although I believe life begins at conception, the fetus is a part of the woman’s body, and therefore she should decide what happens with it. Society will argue the morality of abortion until the extinction of the human race. Like Mill mentioned in General Remarks, “…neither thinkers nor mankind at large seem nearer to being unanimous on the subject.” Morality cannot be defined in a matter of hours, nor requires brilliance, but while the human race works at it, it is important to remember that truths can still have meaning even if society struggles to understand its principles.
Throughout chapter one, General Remarks, one cannot help but to completely agree with the author’s, John Stuart Mill, claim. “The difficulty is not avoided by having recourse to the popular theory of a natural faculty, a sense or instinct, informing us of right and wrong. For- besides that the existence of such- a moral instinct is itself one of the matters in dispute- those believers in it who have any pretensions to philosophy, have been obliged to abandon the idea that it discerns what is right or wrong in the particular case in hand, as our other senses discern the sight or sound actually present.” John Stuart Mill understands the complexity of defining the basis of morality, but realizes it may not be necessary to discover a consensus. The moral instinct of morality, by itself, may be enough to eliminate the need to determine its foundations. By no means is he refuting that morality itself is unimportant, but he claims that there may not be a need to define it. When something comes so instinctively normal, such as morality, why is there a need to define it? Determining whether the existence of moral sense is disputable, but even with its existence, society continues to struggle to distinguish between morally right and wrong. “To inquire how far the bad effects of this deficiency have been mitigated in practice, or to what extent the moral beliefs of mankind have been vitiated or made uncertain by the absence of any distinct recognition of an ultimate standard, would imply a complete survey and criticism, of past and present ethical doctrine. It would, however, be easy to show that whatever...

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