This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Use Of Imagery And Metaphor In Wilfred Owen's Dulce Et Decorum Est

1409 words - 6 pages

Use of Imagery and Metaphor in Wilfred Owen's Dulce et Decorum Est   


    Through vivid imagery and compelling metaphors "Dulce et Decorum Est" gives the reader the exact feeling the author wanted. The poem is an anti-war poem by Wilfred Owen and makes great use of these devices. This poem is very effective because of its excellent manipulation of the mechanical and emotional parts of poetry. Owen's use of exact diction and vivid figurative language emphasizes his point, showing that war is terrible and devastating. Furthermore, the utilization of extremely graphic imagery adds even more to his argument. Through the effective use of all three of these tools, this poem conveys a strong meaning and persuasive argument.

 

To have a better understanding of the poem, it is important to understand some of Wilfred Owen?s history. Owen enlisted in the Artists? Rifles on October 21st 1915. He was eventually drafted to France in 1917. The birth of Owen?s imagery style used in his more famous poems was during his stay at Craiglockhart War Hospital, where he met Siegfried Sassoon (another great war poet). Owen?s new style (the one that was used in "Dulce et Decorum Est") embelished many poems between August 1917 and Septermber 1918 (Spartacus Internet Encyclopedia). On November 4, 1918, Wilfred Owed was killed by enemy machine gun fire as he tried to get his company across the Sambre Canal (Lane 167). The poem tells of a trip that Owen and his platoon of exhausted soldiers had while they were painfully making their way back to base after a harrowing time at the battlefront when a gas shell was fired at them. As a result of this, a soldier in his platoon was fatally gassed.

 

Owen has arranged the poem in three sections, each dealing with a different stage of this experience. He makes use of a simple, regular rhyme scheme, which makes the poem sound almost like a child's poem or nursery rhyme. This technique serves to emphasize the solemn and serious content. In stanza one, Owen describes the soldiers as they set off towards the army base from the front line. The simile "Bent double, like old beggars"(1) not only says that they are tired, but that they are so tired they have been brought down to the level of beggars who have not slept in a bed for weeks on end. Also, the simile "coughing like hags"(2) helps to depict the soldiers? poor health and depressed state of mind. Owen makes us picture the soldiers as ill, disturbed and utterly exhausted. He shows that this is not the government-projected stereotype of a soldier, in gleaming boots and crisp new uniform, but is the true illustration of the poor mental and physical state of the soldiers. By telling us that many of the platoon are barefoot, Owen gives us an idea of how awful the soldiers? journey already is; it then gets even worse. Owen tells us that the soldiers, although they must have been trained, still do not notice the deadly mustard gas shells being fired at them from...

Find Another Essay On Use of Imagery and Metaphor in Wilfred Owen's Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen's representation of war in "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori"

1247 words - 5 pages "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori", "it is sweet and right to die for your country", is a phrase that was widely used at the time of World War I to glorify the war and to encourage young men to fight. This saying became a form of a moral inducement for many young men to take part in World War I, because it created the idea that the soldier's death for his country is highly admirable and patriotically heroic. Wilfred Owen, on the other hand

Compare contrast Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et decorum est" and Thomas McGrath's "Gone Away Blues"

1027 words - 4 pages Wilfred Owen and Thomas McGrath.In this paper, I will argue that despite being written on the same subject, Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est" shows us the reality of the war as a first-hand experience in a serious way with the use of metaphors, irony and imagery. On the other hand, McGrath's "Gone Away Blues" presents the reasons for not joining the war with the extensive use of metaphors in a humorous way, but underneath that humor lies his

Compare and contrast Rupert Brooke's poem, "The Soldier" with Wilfred Owen's,"Dulce Et Decorum Est."

1064 words - 4 pages 'The Soldier' is a sonnet written by Rupert Brooke during the Great War. It was published in 1915. In his war poem Rupert Brooke talks about his feelings toward his home country. He is very concerned with informing the reader about the riches of England and what 'she' [England] can give to others. He is very patriotic telling the reader that it is honourable and heroic to die for one's country. 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' is written by Wilfred Owen

Comparing Wilfred Owen's Poem, Dulce et Decorum Est and Sting's Song, Children's Crusade

2106 words - 8 pages Comparing Wilfred Owen's Poem, Dulce et Decorum Est and Sting's Song, Children's Crusade Is it really sweet and fitting to die for one's country? This may seem glorious to some, but to those who have studied World War I and its terrible consequences, this seems a lie. The poet Wilfred Owen was a participant in this war, and wrote the poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" ("It is sweet and fitting [to die for one's country]") to his poet friends

Analysis of Randall Jarrell's "The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner" and Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum est"

1018 words - 4 pages In today's society, war is often perceived as glorious and mighty. Many movies leave out scenes of young soldiers throwing their lives away and thousands of people dying systematically in unheroic deaths. The poems, "The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner" and "Dulce et Decorum est" attempt to touch on the issues of war. In these poems, the narrators uses imagery, diction and sorrow to show the brutality and sorrow of war."The Death of the Ball

The Reality of War and Death Depicted in Owen's Poem, Dulce Et Decorum Est

1100 words - 4 pages interest and motivates the young generation to join the army and fight for the nation. However, there are artists who look at war in its very naked form. For example the poet Wilfred Owen in his poem “Dulce Et Decorum Est” demonstrates that no sweetness or honor is earned in dying for one’s country, instead humanity is taken away during war. In the first stanza Owen uses strong metaphors and similes to convey a meaningful warning. The first line

Effects of War in "Dulce et Decorum est" and "Anthem for Doomed Youth" by Wilfred Owens

1125 words - 5 pages As a poet, Wilfred Owens wants to show the effects of warfare from the viewpoint of a soldier during a War. Owens uses his own experience as a fighter to capture the reader’s attention and get across his point. He often uses graphic imagery and words to depict his thoughts about war. Wilfred Owens, poems, “Dulce et Decorum est” and “Anthem for doomed youth” talk blatantly about the effects of warfare on the soldiers, their loved ones, and those

Dulce et Decorum est, by Wilfred Owen

1084 words - 4 pages befell those involved. "Dulce et Decorum est", by Wilfred Owen, is one such elegy that presents to the reader a vivid, horrifying description of World War 1, aiming to illustrate that war is not romantic and heroic, but a senseless and devastating event. In this poem, techniques such as imagery, alliteration, assonance, onomatopoeia and contrast are used to express Owen's angry and bitter view towards what happened in the war. "Dulce et

Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen

1396 words - 6 pages its strengths and weaknesses. Experiences in Wilfred Owen’s life shaped his views and beliefs on war that then influenced his poetry, especially in “Dulce et Decorum Est.” Owen “served as a company commander in the Artist's Rifles during World War I” and most of his poetry was created during his time in the war (Columbia). The remarkable imagery throughout Owen’s poetry undoubtedly comes from the events that happened throughout his military

"Dulce et Decorum est" by Wilfred Owen

864 words - 3 pages Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum est" clearly portrays the true identity of war. "Dulce et Decorum est" being a war time poem tries to show its readers the reality of the war, and to show the world that the war is very different from what people believe it to be. Going into more detail throughout the entire poem the author uses a large quantity of imagery that aids the readers in seeing the war from the author's point of view. In addition to

Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen

1880 words - 8 pages war at the time, were to experience life in the Western Front then they would not repeat "the old lie": " Dulce et decorum est. Pro potria mori." The concluding verse of the poem contrasts with the mood and atmosphere of the previous stanzas because it builds up to an exciting climax when Owen exposes his real intention for writing the poem. The build up of emotion, tension and suspense is heightened by the use

Similar Essays

Astonishing Imagery In Wilfred Owen's Poem, Dulce Et Decorum Est

522 words - 2 pages The poem ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ by Wilfred Owen portrays the horrors of World War I with the horrific imagery and the startling use of words he uses. He describes his experience of a gas attack where he lost a member of his squadron and the lasting impact it had on him. He describes how terrible the conditions were for the soldiers and just how bad it was. By doing this he is trying to help stop other soldiers from experiencing what happened in

Form Of War: Content And Form Relation In Wilfred Owen's “Dulce Et Decorum Est”

686 words - 3 pages In Wilfred Owen's “Dulce Et Decorum Est” the form mimics a Shakespearean sonnet. For example,the twelve line stanza at the back-half with the rhyme scheme ABABCDCDEFEF is similar to a Shakespearean sonnet. This clever use of form complements the content of the poem: the poem's content argues against the glorification of war, and the form of the poem matches this argument. This cohesiveness furthers the argument of the poem, and it is

Meaninglessness Glory In Wilfred Owen's Dulce Et Decorum Est

796 words - 3 pages Meaninglessness Glory in Wilfred Owen's Dulce Et Decorum Est It is sweet and proper to die for one’s country. Sweet! And decorous! If in some smothering dreams you too could pace behind that wagon, my friend, you would not tell with such high zest to children ardent for some desperate glory that old lie…. Wilfred Owen titles his poem the Latin translation of what he refers to as “The old Lie” (Dulce Et Decorum Est), and sets out to

Anger And Injustice Described In Wilfred Owen's Poem Dulce Et Decorum Est

1085 words - 4 pages this effectively by using poetic techniques such a imagery, metaphors, similes, alliterations and rhyme. To make the reader feel the same he shocks them with the true horror of the war and involves them in the poem by using words such as 'you'. Owen's true anger and bitterness comes clear at the end with the ironic statement at the end: "The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori."