This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Use Of Imagery In A Doll's House

658 words - 3 pages

Use of Imagery in A Doll's House

Imagery symbolically guides the process of self-emancipation for Nora, the protagonist of A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. Objects like the macaroons, the lamp, the Christmas tree, and costumes represent the movement towards freedom of a woman who was a victim of society. Ibsen painted Nora as a youthful and lovely creature who was brought through life treated as a plaything by both her father and then her husband, Torvald. She must break society's unwritten laws.  Although the consequences of her actions are initially minor, they start her along the path towards crisis when she realizes her position and the injustice of it. Through Ibsen's use of symbolism, objects in the play echo her process of anguish to liberation.

Nora spent most of her life as a toy. Her father would be displeased if she had separate opinions from him. The masquerade and costumes are her own masquerade; their marriage is a decorated Christmas tree. She also pretends to be the doll, letting Torvald dress her up and tell her to dance. Her husband's use of words, names like 'little Miss Obstinate" and "skylark" both showed his affection for her and that his affection was terminal if she were to step outside her porcelain boundaries. As Nora's initial submission, is overturned to tenacity and rebellion, the games she played with her children disappear. Confused, she thinks she will poison them by owing money, but eventually she realizes that it is not debt, but her treatment of her children that will turn them into dolls like her. The Christmas tree has become ragged and stripped of ornamentation, like Nora and Torvald's marriage. When she changes out of her tarantella costume towards the end of the play, she also removes the disguise and turns into a "real" person.

Previous to her transformation, Nora must find other ways of having her own personality. The macaroons, like her flirtation...

Find Another Essay On Use of Imagery in A Doll's House

The Importance of the Dance in A Doll's House

575 words - 2 pages The Importance of the Dance in A Doll's House   Dancing is a beautiful form of expression that reveals a good deal about a person in a matter of minutes.  Characters that dance in plays and novels usually flash some sort of underlying meaning pertaining to their story, shining light on themselves, other characters, and the movement of the action.  In Ibsen's A Doll's House, Nora's performance of the tarantella

An Analysis of Irony in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

765 words - 3 pages both failures. They are able to be honest with each other, converse seriously, and have both been wronged by society. Therefore, they are already exposed to criticism of the world.Works CitedGillis, G. J. and Westhagen, Jen. SparkNote on A Doll's House. 1 Apr. 2004.Goonetilleke, D.C.R.A. "A Doll's House: Overview" in Reference Guide to WorldLiterature. 2nd ed. Ed. Lesley Henderson. St. James Press, 1995.Ibsen, Henrik. Four Great Plays. Trans. R. Farquharson Sharp. Bantom Books: NewYork, 1959.

Nora's Discovery of Self in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1422 words - 6 pages Nora's Discovery of Self in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House       Ibsen's play, "A Doll House," involves a woman who begins the play as a common housewife and through a series of joyous occurrences and catastrophes becomes a self-liberating woman.  Nora Helmer is transformed and decides to abandon her family and home in search of her true self.  She arrives at this point because of several factors.  Her refusal to submit to her husband and

Price of Freedom in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1342 words - 5 pages The Price of Freedom in A Doll's House    Freedom is something that people in all times, places, and experiences have sought after, often against great odds and at a great personal cost. But, in the struggle for freedom, every person gains a sense of true self, if they believe that the freedom which they are fighting for is just. In almost all plays, every character has something threatened which is important to them and which they

The Role of Realism in Ibsen's, A Doll's House

724 words - 3 pages Is “A Doll’s House” simply another text in which the composer questions the ideals of his society? Or is it advocating the rights of women as individuals, perhaps a pioneer in feminist literature? One may argue that “A Doll’s House” is nothing more than a product of Henrik Ibsen’s examination of his contemporary society’s values and morals, specifically those of the bourgeois class. But Ibsen does more than simply reflect upon these values and

The Practices of Dr. Rank in A Doll's House

1929 words - 8 pages The Practices of Dr. Rank   In the play A Doll House, by Henrik Ibsen, the convention of marriage is examined and questioned for its lack of honesty. The play is set in the late 1800s, which provides the backdrop for the debate about roles of people in society. Ibsen uses the minor character, Dr. Rank, to help develop the theme of conflicts within society. This, in turn, creates connections with the plot. Dr. Rank's function in the

The Lie in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1852 words - 7 pages Torvald and Nora characters in A Doll's House.  Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hale, the wives of the men, were looked down upon by their husbands, who were investigating a murder.  The husbands did not give their wives credit for being able to solve a murder.  They told them to stay in the house while the men went out to look for clues.  While the men were outside, the women found substantial evidence and were able to solve the murder.  However, when the men

Comparison of A Doll's House and Antigone

1517 words - 6 pages stand on her own feet. The characters of Nora and Antigone, from Henrik Ibsen’s ‘A Doll’s House’ and Sophocles’ ‘Antigone’ respectively, completely fit my description of ‘the empowered woman’. As inspiring figures, they left me wondering how they maintained their identities even in their patriarchal societies. What touched my heart the most is the way they fight for what they feel is moral and just instead of following what society dictates. I

Use of Imagery in Othello

1961 words - 8 pages that like a snake, and in that time a snake was considered an animal of pure evil. Iago’s character is also revealed through the use of reputation imagery to Cassio and Othello. To Cassio he states “Reputation is an idle and most false imposition” (II iii 267-8) talking to Othello, he says reputation is everything to a man and he is nothing with out it. Iago also refers to the Devil in the following line. “If thou be’est a devil, I cannot kill thee

A Doll's House

10114 words - 40 pages A Doll's House as TragedyHenrik Ibsen's A Doll's House can be seen as defining modern tragedy, and Ibsen's innate ability at creating dramatic situations is evident in the fact that many of the conventions seen in theatre and television drama were developed within this play, some 120 years ago.For instance, the popular BBC1 soap EastEnders recently featured a plot strand revolving around the fate of a letter left by the dead Tiffany, and whether

A Doll's House Essay

912 words - 4 pages play and indirectly sends a message to the audience on how to solve their own problems. Hendrick Ibsen provides a unique analysis on the issues that his culture never thought as being wrong.In the play "A Doll's House", Ibsen tackles women's rights as a matter of importance being neglected. In this play he acknowledges the fact that in nineteenth century European life, the role of the women was to stay home, raise the children, and attend to her

Similar Essays

Unreliability Of Appearances In "A Doll's House"

1388 words - 6 pages Over the course of Henrik Iben's A Doll's House, appearances prove to be misleading, which, in turn lead to the revelation of the reality of the play's characters and situations. The first impressions of Nora, Torvald, and Krogstadt are all eventually undercut. Nora initially seems to be a silly, childish woman, but as the play goes on, we see that she is intelligent, motivated, and, in the end, a strong-willed, independent thinker. Torvald

Symbolism In A Doll's House Essay

827 words - 3 pages Symbolism in A Doll's HouseSymbols are used universally to arouse interest to something prosaic and to stimulate the mind. Henrik Ibsen's play, A Doll's House is fraught with symbols that represent abstract ideas and concepts. These symbols successfully illustrate the inner conflicts that are going on between the characters. A few of the symbols are the macaroons, the Tarantella dance, and the Christmas tree. Nora lies about the macaroons twice

The Awakening Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1071 words - 4 pages The Awakening of Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House    The status of women in the 1800's, when A Doll's House was written, was that of a second-class citizen.  Women did not have the right to vote, own property, or make legal transactions.  The role of women was restricted to that of a housewife.          In A Doll's House, Ibsen does a wonderful job of presenting the character of Nora as person who goes though an awakening about her

The Rebellion Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1371 words - 5 pages The Rebellion of Nora in A Doll's House       A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, was written during a time when the role of woman was that of comforter, helper, and supporter of man. The play generated great controversy due to the fact that it featured a female protagonist seeking individuality.   A Doll's House was one of the first plays to introduce woman as having her own purposes and goals. The heroine, Nora Helmer, progresses during the