Utopean Society Essay

1991 words - 8 pages

Ideas Past and PresentMidterm ProjectSociety as It should have beenThe Amish have it good. They have their own rule set which nobody interferes with. You would think that Amish around the country would be widely different, but the fact remains that there is very little difference (well, some but not a lot really). They have small clustered communities that work together for the common good. They share most things that are large that require the entire village to help create. Communities are known to travel abroad to help one another. They take pride in their homes, their families and their production as a "mini-society." Local governments take precedence over any sort of large distributed system, yet the network of assistance and communication is still there. There is peace and tranquility among the groups because new communities are formed based on a commonly known set of philosophical ideas and guidelines.I feel this reflects how I would like my ideal society to be, with the exception of Religious Belief and the anti-technology stance.Ideally, the society to kick into play would be commune based, but not entirely self-sufficient. The idea of interdependence should not be stricken from a community. Services and products would be developed by large groups of the community to ensure production and completion.All communities would be linked via a network of communication and travel. An elected representative shall be sent from each community within a certain radius to meet with other community leaders every month to share ideas on how to proceed with local government. These representatives shall not make rules. The government shall remain decentralized, and there shall be no states, no capitals, no president, no congress, and no taxes. Discussion will include everything from the local barter systems in use, to the urgency of population control, proper waste removal, and education standards. A guideline of governing principles would be implemented to follow, a constitution, created by the founders of this society. In order to change, upgrade, or delete aging regulations, a majority vote would be passed by the people, for the people.Each community shall not interfere with a citizen's right to do something unless it infringes upon the rights of others. This includes such things as religion and speech. Religious tolerance shall be offered to all, including those who choose no religion. No local government shall take on an official Religious stance as this leads to hate and oppression.The construction and layout of each community will be different and unique in comparison to one another. No two communities will be exact replicas of one another. Some will have stronger points then others, but yet at the same time have weaker points to offer to the community as do others. Each community will have a variety of skilled persons who oversee, and produce services and production as a whole for the community. Each town will be known for a unique element, for...

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