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Utopia And "The Tempest" Essay

1035 words - 4 pages

A utopia is defined as a perfect society. In order to create such a place there would have to be an equal division of chaos and order. Some examples of this can be seen in the play "The Tempest". When people are thrown onto an island with complete anarchy and no authority figure, human instinct takes over and the ability to decipher between right and wrong completely disappears. The following essay will depict the perfect utopia and examples in both "The Tempest" and in real life history that shows it would work.The perfect utopia would have to involve a combination of both chaos and order. In the society that we live in now there is a set and defined line of what we can do with our free will, and where the line is set. If we cross that line with any of our actions then we will be punished by the law (a.k.a. The Man). In the perfect utopia the constitution would mean exactly what it said. For example, in the American constitution it says that we have the free of speech. However we can obviously not say what we really want because some people may find it inappropriate or obscene. This is when organizations such as the FCC come around and slap restrictions on what we can and can't say in the media. This act directly conflicts with the freedom of speech amendment. Also, if you are caught "bashing" someone's name or reputation you can get sued for slander. Once again this is in direct conflict with the freedom of speech amendment. The perfect utopia would have a constitution that said exactly what one was allowed to say and where.An example from "The Tempest" where freedom of speech was wrongly interpreted is when King Alonso's men were conspiring to kill him on the island. The men thought that since they were away from society that they could say, plan and do whatever they pleased because there was no authority figure. However, when coming up with their plan they were over heard by Ariel who foiled their plan by awaking the king and the nobles. In the end of the play the men were reprimanded by Prospero and then found the "real" meaning of freedom of speech.One thing that our society today lacks is the ability to administer fair punishment. When a man or woman is committed of murder they are always sent to jail. However on occasion terrible criminals that have murdered people do face the option of parole. This is an absolutely ridiculous thought that we could reintroduce a convicted killer into society. In the perfect utopia justice would not be solely in the hands of the courts. Power and justice would be shared by both the people and the government. Although in society today a plaintiff is tried in front of a jury of their peers, the jury could really care less about the crime committed or the people it affected. In the utopia the people directly...

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