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Utopia: The Naive Dream. A Book Comparison Between "Lord Of The Flies" By William Golding, "1984" By George Orwell And "Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley

7520 words - 30 pages

Kressl Professor Eisenberg English 111 January 18, 2009 Utopia: The Naïve Dream Dating all the way back to even the Neanderthals, humans have always turned to forming governments. People seem to know intrinsically that they need to have some sort of hierarchy to enable a society to run efficiently. Developing a system, however, that is practicable and just, is a more challenging task than would first seem. Humans have experimented with countless different kinds of structures, yet there has never been a perfect one implemented. No matter, a problem is always already present or about to make itself present. One system will leave the people unhappy, another one will be defenseless against rebellions, and another will not be able to sustain a working economy. This hopeless search for a perfect government is what inspired utopian literature. "The Birds" by Aristophanes and "The Republic" by Plato are fine examples of ancient utopian literature. Nevertheless, it was only in 1516, when Sir Thomas wrote his legendary book, "Utopia," that it became an official genre. The word 'utopia' comes from two Greek words that mean "good place" and "no place." A utopia is the place where every person wants to live, yet is virtually impossible to exist. Whenever it has been tried, there is always something that has to ruin the dream of it succeeding- whether it be an external or internal rebellion. Most "utopian experts" hold that a society must own a certain number of qualities for it to be labeled as a utopia. The first characteristic is that it must have as set of principles that are in accord with the needs and desires of the people. The second is that there has to be a competent leader or group of leaders who is able to insure that the principles set by the society are being kept. The third defining feature is that there be a system that can ably realize the set ideals. The last, of course, is whether, the society is successful, and everything happens as expected. When the realization that no society will ever to be able to reach the utopian level, a new genre, dystopian literature, began to prevail. A dystopia is the exact opposite of a utopia; it is a bad place. Chaos and mayhem ensues, the people are depressed, or any of the other ills that commonly plague a society arise. This grew especially fashionable in light of the two world wars that occurred in the early twentieth century. William Golding, Aldous Huxley, and George Orwell all wrote their books, "Lord of the Flies," "Brave New World," and "Nineteen Eighty-Four," respectively, in step with the times they were each living in, the early twentieth century. Each book is a mirror to the mood and sentiment felt during that period, and is a response to those experiences. They each tell a story set in a dystopian society, and as the tale progresses, the author is able to inform his audience of the dangers and menaces that makes it a dystopia. A society is started when it can be decided what its values are...

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