Utopias Essay

829 words - 3 pages

Utopias The idea of a utopia is something that means something different to almost everybody. By definition a utopia means an ideal state, paradise, or a land of enchantment. The idea of a utopia has been a central part of the history of ideas in Western Civilization. Philosophers and writers imagine and conceive plans for an ideal state even today. The fascination with utopia's are most likely the result of new and improved ways of thinking. Many different social problems have plagued society for centuries and have resulted in more logical and optimistic thinking. This kind of thinking led to ideas of how to improve society, and eventually to create a utopia. One reason for the popularity of this idea is the fact that after the Enlightenment, people questioned what their purpose was on Earth and creating a utopia seemed like an achievable goal.

This idea is apparent in several books.

In Voltaire's Candide, he writes of the travels of a young man who is extremely naive and unsuspecting but just so happens to find utopia. "What sort of country is this, said they to one another, a country unknown to the rest of the world, and where the nature is of a kind so different from ours? It is probably the country where all is well; for there absolutely must be one such place." (Voltaire, 42.) That is how Candide described the utopian society known as El Dorado when he had first discovered it accompanied by his friend Cacambo. As Candide continued to stay in El Dorado, he found that things in this perfect society were in fact perfect and everyone was truly happy. Despite the fact that Candide was unable to stay in El Dorado for a long time, he did in fact get to experience what was intended to be a utopia. Candide questioned how this perfect society was created and run, but found no logical answers. Even though Candide was far from an Enlightenment thinker, he was bothered by the same questions that many great writers and thinkers had been; how is a perfect society created and kept perfect? In Karl Marx and Fredrick Engels Communist Manifesto, this utopian society was portrayed and in doing so answered such questions as to how to achieve this lifelong goal of perfection through total social restructuring. Marx's idea of a utopian soicety was to be achieved through the successful implementation of socialism. In this perfect state, the working class will unite and everyone will work to there ability. In turn, they will receive everything they need from the government. "They still dream of experimental realization of their social utopias of founding isolated...

Find Another Essay On Utopias

Comparing the anti-utopias of Essay

653 words - 3 pages Both Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and Geroge Orwell's 1984 present to the reader anti-utopian societies; societies which,...

Compare Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451 on utopias

1987 words - 8 pages Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451 are two novels, both set in the future, which have numerous similarities throughout them. Of all their common factors, those that stand out most would have to be: first, the outlawed reading of books; second, the superficial preservation of beauty and happiness; and third, the theme of the protagonist as being a loner or an outcast from society because of his differences in beliefs as opposed to the norm....

Utopian Dysfunction

620 words - 2 pages Houyhnhnm’s Land is a society unique to Gulliver’s adventures because he encounters not only horses reigning over society, but also that these supreme animals think more rationally and intellectually than the Yahoos and even Gulliver himself. Gulliver’s stay in Houyhnhnm’s Land represents the “perfect”, but emotionless and detached conventions of utopia. According to Dr. Joyce Hertzler’s The History of Utopian Thought, utopians hold a false view...

utopian societies

616 words - 2 pages The term “Utopia” was first coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516 from Greek word “ou-topos” meaning “no place” or “nowhere”. Utopia is used to signify a visionary or an ideally perfect state of society, whose members live the best possible life. The perception of the concept utopia originated in the ancient world, where peoples desire to create or recreate an ideal society helped establish the utopian idea. The term was taken from Thomas More’s...

Literary Utopian Societies

1715 words - 7 pages Literary Utopian Societies “The vision of one century is often the reality of the next…” (Nelson 108). Throughout time, great minds have constructed their own visions of utopia. Through the study of utopias, one finds that these “perfect” societies have many flaws. For example, most utopias tend to have an authoritarian nature (Manuel 3). Also, another obvious imperfection found in the majority of utopias is that of a faulty social class...

Utopian Dysfunctionalism

1169 words - 5 pages Houyhnhnm’s Land is a society unique to Gulliver’s adventures because he encounters not only horses reigning over society, but also that these supreme animals think more rationally and intellectually than the Yahoos and even Gulliver himself. Gulliver’s stay in Houyhnhnm’s Land represents the “perfect”, but emotionless and detached conventions of utopia. According to Dr. Joyce Hertzler’s The History of Utopian Thought, utopians hold a false view...

"Utopia: An Interaction Between Social Idealism and Realism"

3574 words - 14 pages Utopia is an ideal society where in the government, laws, and social settings is picture perfect. Sir Thomas More during the 16th century invented this idea. And up to this day, it is still a very intriguing issue, whether or not a dream society can come true. Many great politicians and leaders have been distinguished throughout history yet none of them were able to...

City of the Sun vs New Atlantis

1273 words - 5 pages Bacon insist that humans don't need to aspire to fewer desires because the advances of science would make it possible to appease bodily desires by providing material things and that would satisfy human greed. The Solomon's House is a vision of future knowledge in an intellectual setting. Bacon views science advancement as the path to increase control over nature. His utopia provides comfort and conveniences for all people. Campanella's utopia...

UTOPİAS

590 words - 2 pages Fantasy is important for the writers of utopias because the vision of reality is almost necessarily idealized or demonic. To put across the intensity and significance of either, the author departs from the dullness of everyday, and that can be done with fantasy. Since the creation of Earth, manhood searched the earth for the reasons of life and the pursuit of tranquality roaming the planet looking for personal answers to the questions that...

A Better Life Feature Article: Utopia

584 words - 2 pages The literal meaning of Utopia is actually “no place” or “place that does not exist”. Utopia is the perfect; ideal but unattainable place that everyone strives towards to. This imaginary place has the ideal civilisation and society.There is a utopia in every one’s hearts. A lot of people are dissatisfied with their lot in their...

Nietzsche And Platonism

930 words - 4 pages In Twilight of the Idols Nietzsche writes, "My objection against the whole of sociology in England and France remains that it knows from experience only the forms of decay, and with perfect innocence accepts its instincts of decay as the norm of sociological value-judgments. The decline of life, the decrease in the power to organize, that is to tear open clefts, subordinate and super-ordinate -- all this has been formulated as the ideal in...

Similar Essays

Utopias Of 21st Century Essay

9963 words - 40 pages PAGE Utopias of 21st CenturyFeminist UtopiaPhilosophers provided this careful and spirited defense of utopian thinking and practice, arguing that we must approach the twenty-first century with renewed hope for our common future rather than with despairing disengagement from public life. (McKenna,125) Acknowledging that utopian thought is too...

Forms Of Society, Utopias And Capitalism.

1291 words - 5 pages Society is based upon human nature to grow and succeed. Two forms of society that can meet the demands of human nature are utopias and capitalism. Both in there own way allow for some period of growth for a society. Different forms of these models exist but neither in its pure form is visible toady in any nation.In a capitalist society, the general public controls the economy. It allows people to create business and money can flow free...

The Ambiguous Utopias Of Ursula Le Guin

3575 words - 14 pages IntroductionAfter the first World War the genre of utopian science fiction slowly started to disappear, almost vanishing later in the century. A new fiction genre had started taking its place, Dystopias, easily described as the opposite of a Utopia (a purely evil place where the people are suppressed). However, after this Utopias experienced a revival. They were mostly written by relatively young Americans and were fuelled by the social...

The Possibilities Of Utopias In Gulliver's Travels By Jonathan Swift

734 words - 3 pages The idea of the perfect and model state has existed since the beginning of civilization. In Jonathon Swift’s satirical novel Gulliver’s Travels, Gulliver travels to remote lands and is keen on analyzing and investigating the possibility of utopias. There are noticeable instances of utopias in Gulliver’s Travels; such is symbolized by the Houyhnhnms and the Lilliputians. However, most of these states could not be logically achievable in Swifts’...