Vaccination Vs. Autism Essay

1045 words - 5 pages

Liz Szabo is a medical reporter for USA Today. She specializes in articles on cancer, children's health, parenting, and environmental health. In the following viewpoint, Szabo examines some of the dangers presented by public acceptance of celebrity endorsements of unproven and potentially hazardous alternative health remedies. Szabo explains that celebrities can have a positive impact on public health by raising awareness about illnesses and preventive medical testing, as former first lady Betty Ford did when her public disclosure of her struggle with breast cancer and mastectomy prompted more women to get mammograms. Unfortunately, Szabo relates, when celebrities promote dangerous misinformation, as she explains actress Jenny McCarthy did when she launched a very public campaign citing a since disproven link between childhood vaccines and autism, the negative impact on public health can be profound. Jenny McCarthy, an American model, actress, and an anti-vaccine activist, presents an action following a report on vaccination and how it affected her son with a complex disorder in the brain development, autism. McCarthy's claims that vaccines cause autism are not supported by any medical evidence, and the original paper by Andrew Wakefield that formed the basis for the claims has been shown to be based on manipulated data and fraudulent research. Vaccination is widely considered one of the greatest medical achievements of modern civilization. Due to the creation of vaccination about 100 years ago, many diseases in common areas are very rare because of the medical cures vaccination can do. For a vaccine to work well on a person, it must be in a level where it is sufficient to others. One of the solutions to this situation is to provide vaccination shots to schools and health offices. Vaccinations allow the students to have a perfect attendance in school. Many of the vaccination programs focus more onto the negative side effects of the cure, rather than how it may aide the person in the long run. Because the focus is not on the healthy side, many parents are harshly criticizing the effects of vaccination to their kids such as autism and other brain development syndrome. These dilemmas can shut down many vaccination programs, in which allows people to have no knowledge of the cure besides hearing or seeing the information about vaccines on TV, billboards, and other media showings.
Everywhere people go during the early falls to end of winter, there is always news about how bad the weather is and how their kids should get vaccinated. Why is this always happening everywhere when people can simply go take their kids to be immunized. Why aren’t parents getting their children are the big question here. It is either because of how they practice their religion or how inattentive the parents are. What the reason may be is puzzling, but the fact that immunization has cured and decimated the death percentage rate has shown positive effects. By taking the...

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