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Importance Of Nick Carraway, Narrator Of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

1134 words - 5 pages

Importance of Nick Carraway, Narrator of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

   In The Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the narrator,
Nick Carraway, tells a story in which Jay Gatsby tries to attain happiness
through wealth.  Even though the novel is titled after Gatsby, Nick
analyzes the actions of others and presents the story so that the reader
can comprehend the theme. Throughout the novel, Nick is the vehicle used
to gather all of the pieces together to learn about Gatsby.  Nick is the
only character that changes in the novel from the beginning to the end.

     Nick is the literary device that is employed to learn about Gatsby, which
ultimately tells the theme of the story.  Throughout the novel, flashbacks are
inserted, courtesy of Nick, to reveal piece by piece about the mysterious Gatsby. Nick patches the pieces of the puzzle together regarding Gatsby's past and lack
of a future.   Nick is like the box of a puzzle; the puzzle is impossible to put
together without it.  Without Nick, the reader's opinion of Gatsby would be
drastically different.  The reader's opinion would be swayed by the idea that
Gatsby becomes rich via bootlegging alcohol and counterfeiting bonds.  Nick
persuades the observer that Gatsby is "...worth the whole damn bunch (rich class)
put together"(Fitzgerald 162).  Even though Gatsby aspires to be part of the upper echelon, he, fortunately, is different from them.  Nick also analyzes Gatsby's behavior
in order to provide the reader with details and a summary of the great man.  At
the end of the novel, Nick comments on Gatsby's life by stating that "(Gatsby)
had come a long way to this blue lawn and his dream must have seemed so close
that he could hardly fail to grasp it.  He did not know that it was already
behind him"(Fitzgerald 189).   Without Nick, Gatsby's true colors would not be shown and his behavior would be left not pondered.  His presence from the beginning to the
end of the novel is imperative.  Nick's uniqueness parallels his importance in
the novel.

     Nick is very unique and different from all of the other characters in The
Great Gatsby.   Most of the characters symbolize reckless people during the "rip
roaring twenties" that only want to be in the "fast lane" and do not give a damn
about others.  Nick sticks out of this crowd like a "sore thumb". Geographically, Nick was raised in the "friendly" middle-east, while the book
takes place in the "snobby" east.  Tom, which is a representative of the rich,
casually has an affair with Mrytle while with Daisy.  On the other hand, Nick
does not get involved with Jordan extensively because he has not broken
relations with his old girlfriend in Chicago.  He promises himself that "there
(is) a vague understanding that (has) to be tactfully broken off before I (am)
free"(Fitzgerald 64).  

As a result of Nick's and the other...

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