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Vampirism And Sexuality, The Story Dracula, By Bram Stoker

1431 words - 6 pages

The role of the women in the story Dracula, by Bram Stoker, is seen as one that defines the role of women in society during the nineteenth century. During this time in Victorian England, women held a role that required them to behave in a certain way. The norm of this time entails her to be the ideal image of purity and modesty. Women of this era had to live as an virgin wife figure of purity, and if unable to fulfill this role, she would be seen as a whore. However, the effect that the count Dracula has on the women after his attacking spree, results in vampirism. This vampiric role changes people into sexual predators who are out to bring others into their dark side for Dracula. There are many parallels between vampirism and sexuality that can be seen throughout the novel. These can be seen through the change in a woman's sexuality after transforming into a vampire and the role of desire, and through the sexual implications of blood transfusions given to Lucy and the stake driving done to free her from her vampire state.The two main women in the novel are compared to each other to emphasize the role of the ideal Victorian England woman. The woman in the novel who is seen as the epitome of this perfect role is Mina. She is an educated professional who is seen as an ideal wife and ideal motherly figure to others. In her journal she writes, "I have been working very hard to keep up with Jonathan's studies, and I have been practicing shorthand very assiduously. When we are married I shall be useful to Jonathan." This shows that Mina is such a good wife to her husband and will do anything to assist him. She is the sweet nurturing mother figure that all the men praise and want. On the contrary however, Lucy becomes the opposite of the ideal Victorian England woman. Dracula's success in overtaking Lucy to the dark side makes her a sexualized and corrupt woman. Instead of talking about being loyal to her fiancé Arthur, and being of help to him, she is wondering "Why can't they let a girl marry three men, or as many as want her." This shows that she does not care about having loyalty to the man she is committing to and how much of a sex fiend she has become. She is seen as a woman with untamed desires and thus relieves those desires sexually going against the societal standards.Although Mina is seen as the perfect woman, she is unknowingly competing with the overpowering sexuality of vampires with her husband. In his journal entry about his encounter with the weird sisters, Jonathan illustratively writes about the sexuality of the vampires and how they entice desire in him. These women, just like Lucy, are the opposite of what the ideal woman is supposed to be like. Jonathan describes "There [being] a deliberate voluptuousness which was both thrilling and repulsive." The term voluptuous has been used several times by Stoker in order to describe women and their sexual physique and frame of mind. The fact that Jonathan said this shows that he has a...

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