Victor Is The True Villain Of Frankenstein

1248 words - 5 pages

At first glance, the monster in Frankenstein is a symbol of evil, whose only desire is to ruin lives. He has been called "A creature that wreaks havoc by destroying innocent lives often without remorse. He can be viewed as the antagonist, the element Victor must overcome to restore balance and tranquility to the world." But after the novel is looked at on different levels, one becomes aware that the creature wasn't responsible for his actions, and was just a victim of circumstance. The real villain of Frankenstein isn't the creature, but rather his creator, Victor.

As a romantic novel Victor is responsible, because he abandoned his creation. As an archetype novel, Victor is the villain, because he was trying to play god. Finally, Victor as a Gothic novel, Victor is at fault, because, he and the creature are two different parts of the same person. If Frankenstein is looked at as a romantic novel, Victor, not the creature, is truly the villain. When Victor created the creature, he didn't take responsibility for it. He abandoned it, and left it to fend for itself. It is unfair to bring something into the world, and then not teach it how to survive. The creature was miserable, and just wanted a friend or someone to talk to. On page 115, the creature said, "Hateful day when I received life! Accursed the creator. Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust." This line shows the agony the monster was in, because of how he looked when he was created which led to even Victor running away from him. If Victor didn't run, he could have taught the monster and made his life happy. After the creature scared the cottagers away he said, "I continued for the remainder of the day in my hovel in a state of utter and stupid despair. My protectors had departed and broken the only link that held me to the world. For the first time, feelings of revenge and hatred filled my bosom . . ." This is another example of how the creature wanted someone to talk to him and be his friend, and that person should have been Victor.

Victor is also a villain in a Archetype sense. Victor was trying to play god, when he created the creature, and that is something he shouldn't have done, because humans can't become too powerful, even though they always try. Victor became so obsessed with creating life, that it clouded his judgment, and took up all of his time and energy. On page 66, just before Justine's trial, Victor thought to himself, "During the whole of this wretched mockery of justice I suffered living torture. It was to be whether the result of my curiosity and lawless devices would cause the death of two of my fellow beings." This line shows two things, first Victor knew that Justine, and William's death was his fault. Also, he knew that his experiments, shouldn't have been done, and were against the laws of nature and god. On page 39, Victor says, "Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a...

Find Another Essay On Victor is the True Villain of Frankenstein

"It is Macbeth who kills Duncan, but it is Lady Macbeth who is the true villain of the play."

581 words - 2 pages Lady Macbeth is the true villain of the play, Macbeth. This is portrayed and supported by many different productions as well as the play itself. In every Shakespearean tragedy, a crucial character is always present. This is the villain, someone who triggers a chain of unfortunate events, leading the to protagonists’ downfall. In this case, it is inevitably Lady Macbeth’s role.The major turning point of Macbeth begins with the

Victor Frankenstein is Ultimately Responsible for the Tragic Deaths

2016 words - 8 pages Running head: VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN IS ULTIMATELY RESPONSIBLE/DEATHS 1Victor Frankenstein is Ultimately Responsible for the Tragic DeathsChrista GarzaSiena Heights UniversityENG 341VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN IS ULTIMATELY RESPONSIBLE FOR / TRAGIC DEATHS 2In Mary Shelley's (1994) Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein is absolutely responsible for the disastrous events that occur in the novel. The death of his loved ones, William, Justine, Clerval, and

Victor Frankenstein is Ultimately Responsible for the Tragic Deaths

2016 words - 8 pages Running head: VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN IS ULTIMATELY RESPONSIBLE/DEATHS 1Victor Frankenstein is Ultimately Responsible for the Tragic DeathsChrista GarzaSiena Heights UniversityENG 341VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN IS ULTIMATELY RESPONSIBLE FOR / TRAGIC DEATHS 2In Mary Shelley's (1994) Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein is absolutely responsible for the disastrous events that occur in the novel. The death of his loved ones, William, Justine, Clerval, and

Victor Frankenstein Goes Beyond The Laws of Nature

1077 words - 4 pages Victor Frankenstein is the protagonist and the narrator of the main story in Frankenstein. Raised by doting parents, Victor confesses: “I was their plaything and their idol, and something better-their child, the innocent and helpless creature bestowed on them by Heaven, whom to bring up to good, and whose future lot it was in their hands to direct to happiness or misery, according as they fulfilled their duties towards me.” (35) This

Victor Frankenstein Is To Blame Mary Shelly Frankenstein

1273 words - 5 pages PAGE PAGE 1 Barbuto, Jordana BarbutoMr. PurificatoENG-3UIApril 20, 2007Victor Frankenstein Is To BlameIn the gothic novel Frankenstein written by Mary Shelly Victor Frankenstein creates a monster. At first glance this gothic tale is about this creature's terrible action against society in the late 1700's. Many people who read this novel, would believe that the monster to be the novels villain, however the events that occurred are that

Victor Frankenstein: Product of His Upbringing

1495 words - 6 pages , his beloved and stalwart natural philosophy. He continues along the path his parents pave for him even if it is paved through the graves of the recently deceased. Because of his indulgent and insulated childhood, Victor Frankenstein damningly lacks the desirous amount of humanity long before his progeny comes to take his first breath. Works Cited Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. Second ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2012. Apple iBook.

Title: Fair is Foul, and Foul is Fair Macbeth: Who is the true villain in the play?

1330 words - 5 pages proud to announce the new king of Scotland, Malcom. Macduff consistently shows his extreme dedication to his country, and never puts the well-being of his individual self in front of that priority-wise, this proves him to not be a villain; however, this isn’t true for all characters.Banquo is at first a friend to Macbeth but represents his opposite, and like Macbeth, he thinks about his ambitions in being great; however not in evil ways will he

Psychoanalysis of Victor Frankenstein Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

1252 words - 5 pages In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein creates a monster that murders several people, and then flees through Europe to the Arctic Circle. In the beginning of the story, it seems that Frankenstein is simply a scientist chasing a pipe dream of finding the key to eternal life, but closer analysis of the text reveals that Frankenstein is not sane, and possibly suffering from one of many psychology disorders, causing hallucinations and

Victor Frankenstein as the Monster in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

1903 words - 8 pages In the novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, Victor Frankenstein is the true monster, not the creature himself. Victor Frankenstein grew up in Geneva. He had a strong interest in reading the works of the ancient and outdated alchemists, and was fascinated by science and the 'secret of life.' One day he decided that he wanted to study further, so Victor actually created a person of his own out of old body parts and strange chemicals. When the

The True Villian in Frankenstein

1444 words - 6 pages Mary Shelly wrote the Gothic tale Frankenstein. In the novel, who is the true villain, the Monster or Victor Frankenstein? Which character do you have the most sympathy for? Mary Shelly wrote the novel “Frankenstein” using gothic techniques. Nearly 200 years after the book was first published in 1818 the readers still debate about the real villain of the story. Victor Frankenstein could be the hero of the story; the reader sympathises

Victor and the Monster are Reciprocals in "Frankenstein"

577 words - 2 pages There are many themes in the novel Frankenstein. One of these themes is that the monster and Victor are reciprocals. They were always and always will be linked. They are related in many different ways. In the following paragraphs I have mentioned four of them. One of these ways is that they are both isolated from society. The monster is isolated because of his physical features. Because he is ugly he is a social outcast. Victor isolates

Similar Essays

Frankenstein Victor Is The Villain Not Victim

1362 words - 5 pages I believe Frankenstein is a villain in this book. I believe he promotes the idea of evil which is symbolised through creating the creature. He is described as “a creature causing havoc”. The creature is an unwanted person. He has no belonging in this world. He was created, and because of this, he is an outcast because of Victor Frankenstein. The creature is the victim. He is lonely and rejected. Frankenstein is the cause of this. I believe it is

The True Monster (Comparison Between Victor Frankenstein And The Monster)

1292 words - 5 pages creature murders Frankenstein's wife and best friend (Hawkins). Frankenstein is a story that focuses on the outcome of Victor’s endeavor to interfere with nature. In the novel, Victor's creation is not born evil; rather it is the result of poor parenting that he becomes evil and vengeful. Throughout the novel, Shelley creates a definite perception of the creature and his creator by using various writing techniques. Shelley makes readers

The Duchess Of Malfi: A True Villain

1994 words - 8 pages the novel, specifically when she hides her marriage and pregnancy and when she seeks revenge on others. Therefore, she is undoubtedly evil. Ultimately, because it is the Duchess’s own personal decisions that result in everyone in the story being killed, she is the true villain of this story. Works Cited "Act III. Scene V. Webster, John. 1909-14. The Duchess of Malfi. The Harvard Classics." Act III. Scene V. Webster, John. 1909-14. The

The Creature In Frankenstein Is Not The Villain

1146 words - 5 pages more than to be loved and accepted, it is surrounded by people who judge it as evil because of its terrible appearance. The monster is isolated and demonized by human society” (Frankenstein: Characters). The creature’s evil and strong appearance concealed his true peaceful nature from society blinded them with fear. The creature had to find out himself that his sight revolted humans when he saved this child. If Victor had kept the creature, he