Views Of American Culture Essay

2188 words - 9 pages

“Failure is not a single, cataclysmic event. You don't fail overnight. Instead, failure is a few errors in judgement, repeated every day” (Rohn1). Viewing pop culture it is common to see people who are being judged. These people are judged and put down in harsh ways, most frequently these stars are doing simple things that the average person would do.Is it so abnormal for a young woman in her twenties to drink? The legal drinking age is twenty-one. Is it so bad that people lose control of things occasionally under stress? In viewing similarities and differences in Lindsay Lohan and Elizabeth Taylor it is obvious to say that American culture as a whole is very judgemental towards people in the limelight.
Egoism and relativism are both factors in pop culture. Simply defined egoism is An ethical theory that treats self-interest as the foundation of mortality. “The focus of ethical egoism is self-interest, for ethical egoist, the best ethical decision in a given situation must be decided based on the positive and/or negative outcomes as they apply to the self.”(Verlard 164). Meaning, people are more worried about self- interest then the population as a whole, therefore they spotlight every little wrong thing a celebrity does. People do not give celebrities the chance to mess up like a normal person and then fix it.They do not want the things they do not like to be publicised as good so they are tabloiding their opinions and only pointing out the bad in a person. Any one celebrity can contribute good things aslo bad things to the public. The Poparazzi only show the bad things any one celebrity does knowing the common people speculate those things as bad unneeded or vulgar. Relativism is the doctrine that knowledge, truth, and morality exist in relation to culture, society, or historical context, and are not absolute. Meaning, people are using the “truth” and manipulating it to make the celebrities look bad. Society also uses as much things bad about a person as they can find to ruin their career due to small mistakes made in their lifetime.
In the celebrity world people are judged, they don't get a second chance.“Those who adhere to ethical egoism seek solutions to moral dilemmas on the basis of the amount of good or bad that will result from a decision.The idea is to make an ethical decision that results in the greatest long-term good for the self.(Verlard 164) This further proves that the people are more interested in their own likes v.s dislikes. People have a bias on the topic of celebrity lives. They see them as people whom only make mistakes. Their not even interested in the good things they have done or are yet to do. The average person lets the wrongs outweigh the goods within a celebrity. Only two very good facts have been visualized in the reading above, but those are on pop culture in the present day. Relativism and egoism play a large part in the analysis of Elizabeth Taylor and Lindsay Lohan's life and career.
Egoism much like...

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