This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Views On Pride, Prejudice And Marriage In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

6163 words - 25 pages

Views on Pride, Prejudice and Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

Pride

pride n., v., 1. high (or too high) opinion of one's own dignity,
importance, worth, etc. 2. the condition or feeling of being proud. 3.
a noble sense of what is due to oneself or one's position or
character; self respect; self esteem. prejudice n., v., 1. an opinion

In the novel by Jane Austen, displays a severe contrast between
Elizabeth and Darcy in the story. Jane Austen does this by discussing
the theme of pride throughout the novel. The concept of pride in this
book is defined as an excessively high opinion of one's own dignity,
importance and worth.

Throughout the novel, Jane Austen satirizes the manners of all
classes, exposing people who have excessive pride as rude and often
foolish, regardless of wealth or station.

While the term of pride pertains particularly to Mr. Darcy there are
other characters that portray this trait as well. Jane Austen has
depicted pride in her minor characters as a means of demonstrating its
importance as a theme of this novel.

Among the minor characters that Jane Austen uses to portray
unattractive pride is Mr Collins. Jane Austen used Mr. Collins as an
extreme example of how excessive pride can affect one's manner and be
a very unattractive quality. In Mr. Collin's case, he prides himself
on his sense of respectability, his profession, and his association
with Lady Catherine. Jane Austen shows through the voice of the
narrator that she disapproves of Mr. Collins, which is why she
satirises him.

' MR. Collins was not a sensible manâ?¦. A fortunate chance had
recommended him to lady Catherine de Bourghâ?¦ The respect for which he
felt for her high rank, and his veneration for her as his patroness,
mingling with a very good opinion of himself, of his authority as a
clergy man, and his rights as a rector, made him altogether a mixture
of pride and obsequiousness, self-importance and humility.'(Chapter 15
page 61)

This quote shows Mr Collins does not have a legitimate reason to be
proud.. Jane Austen makes Mr Collins look very ridiculous throughout
the novel, seeing as he is a clergyman, but meanwhile is a very
materialistic man. He tries to come across as a humble man, when in
actual fact he has a very materialistic outlook to life, he values
only quantity or size of house. This makes him look incredibly stupid,
because he is meant to be a man of the church, but is unbelievably
lacking in Christian spirit.

Mr Collins proposes to Elizabeth in Chapter 19 the way Mr Collins
proposes shows his pride and gives the impression that Mr Collins is a
stupid man, and has no idea how to treat a lady with respect. He comes
across as selfish because he talks of no feelings of love for her.
While asking Elizabeth for her hand in marriage, he also...

Find Another Essay On Views on Pride, Prejudice and Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen's Portrayal of Marriage in Pride and Prejudice

2867 words - 11 pages Jane Austen's Portrayal of Marriage in Pride and Prejudice Marriage plays an extremely important role in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice'. The novel begins with the sentence "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." This single sentence extremely significant in the fact that it is strongly connected with one of the main themes of the

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Essay

1261 words - 5 pages Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice "Consider Charlotte's views on marriage and to what extent she puts them into practice". Charlotte Lucas, of Lucas Lodge, when talking to Elizabeth voices her opinions on marriage. Among her conceptions are: · That she thinks Elizabeth's sister Jane should encourage Mr Bingley and show him how she feels, because nobody is self-confident enough to truly love someone

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

1907 words - 8 pages Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife" Jane Austen used this quote to open her second book, 'Pride and Prejudice', which was first published in 1813. This is a story of the attitudes towards love and marriage in the nineteenth century, through the eyes of a number of people in different family situations and levels of

Marriage Proposals in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

1687 words - 7 pages Marriage Proposals in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Romance Versus Security. "It is universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." These are the words of Jane Austen, and like many people of her time, she believed very much in the importance of finding a wealthy husband for young women. Jane Austen's novel reflects the importance of marriage to

The Theme of Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

984 words - 4 pages The Theme of Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice One of the main themes in Pride And Prejudice is marriage. Throughout the novel, the author describes the various types of marriages and reasons behind them. "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. The novel demonstrates how many women need to marry men they are not in love with simply

The Attitudes Toward Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

1394 words - 6 pages The Attitudes Toward Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Jane Austin wrote the novel Pride and Prejudice in 1813. The novel provides a great deal of information and gives us a detailed insight to the different attitudes towards marriages at the time. Pride and Prejudice is focused and written about the lifestyles among "gentry

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

3161 words - 13 pages Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775 to the Reverend George Austen and his wife in Hampshire, England. The sixth child out of the seven, Jane was educated mostly at her home although she and her sister, Cassandra, were sent away to school for several years when they were young. Austen wrote several novels when she was in her teens, but her major works were written later on in her

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

1084 words - 4 pages Arguably one of Jane Austen’s most iconic novels, Pride and Prejudice, tells a story of an unlikely romance between Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy. What makes this novel so wonderful is the characters and their interactions. In chapter fifty-nine, Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy have become engaged. This chapter is wonderful and necessary to the novel for the description of Elizabeth’s true emotion and the reactions of Elizabeth’s family after they

Letters in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

2860 words - 11 pages Letters in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Pride and Prejudice is one of the great love stories of our time. Its continued popularity shows that its essential story can still be adapted to modern day life. Set in the 1800s, it tells the love story of two people who gradually learn to understand each other and themselves. In the time that the novel is set, modern means of communication, for example telephones and computers were not

Analysis of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

1276 words - 5 pages Analysis of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Pride and prejudice is a novel set in the late 17th Century and was written by author Jane Austen. The novel is based upon the theme of marriage and social settings of the 17th century. The novel is set in an era where women where 2nd class citizens and were inferior to men. This is ever so prevalent in the novel. In the time of which the novel is set women were not meant to meddle in men’s

Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

2096 words - 8 pages Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice In the fictional world of Jane Austen, the lives of the characters are based on societal values and mores that only exist in her novels. The characters and situations that she puts forth are not concerned with the outside world at all; they are a world in their own. Austen populated this unique world with morals and characters according to the way of life she knew

Similar Essays

Love And Marriage In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

2826 words - 11 pages Examine the themes of love and marriage in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Pride and Prejudice is the best known and best loved novel of the English writer, Jane Austen, who first gave the novel its modern character through the treatment of everyday life. Austen started to write for family amusement as a child, and received a broader education than many women of her time, as she grew up in an upper-class environment, which she wrote

Love And Marriage In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

3238 words - 13 pages Love and Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Analyse Jane Austen's presentation of love and marriage in her novel Pride & Prejudice. From your evidence suggest what Austen regards as a 'good' marriage. On first impressions of the novel, my own prejudices clouded my judgement of the book and of what it might have consisted. Living in the 21st Century it is somewhat difficult to imagine anything remotely

Love And Marriage In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

3752 words - 15 pages Love and Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Pride and Prejudice was published in 1813 during the Regency period. From a woman’s point of view, marriage was seen as “the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune”. Marriage was seen as the only way of securing a home and a decent living. If a woman wasn’t married she would have the life of a spinster, and depend upon a family

Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice Essay 1153 Words

1153 words - 5 pages characters. In Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice, she divulges the central theme of society and social class through the characters Elizabeth Bennet, Mr. Darcy, and Lady Catherine. The first character that Austen uses to analyze this theme is Elizabeth Bennet. Austen describes Elizabeth as “uncommonly intelligent” (qtd. in Auerbach 135). She struggles to express her individuality in a society that is based upon prominent social conformity