Virginia Woolf: A Room Of Her Own

727 words - 3 pages

Virginia Woolf, an original, thought-provoking feminist author, influenced women to fight for equality and to question the opportunities for women in literature. With her diaries, novels and poems, she stunned her readers with something they have not seen much before: women rebelling. Woolf was frustrated with women and the untouched and suppressed skills they harbor. She once said, “Women have sat indoors all these millions of years, so that by this time the very walls are permeated by their created force, which has, indeed, so overcharged the capacity of bricks and mortar that it must needs harness itself to pens and brushes and business and politics” (Feminist 595). Woolf sought to eliminate the perceived ideas of women and enlighten readers of the skills that women possess.
Feminism is the idea of economic, communal, and political equality between genders. Women longed for the same opportunities as men obtain. They wanted to be able to change the world. In the 19th century, educators, psychologists, sociologists and mass media had a part in making women believe that living as housewives and mothers will be the only life that will bring contentment. Women had very restricted opportunities to express feelings or skills. As many may think, women are treated equally in the present because of the feminist movement. Actually, there are women in third-world countries that are denied access to education and schooling because of their gender. Feminism, over the years, has become socially known with the publishing of more than thirty national feminist news and opinion magazines.
The feminist movement occurred in three “waves”. The first wave began in the 19th century and ended in the 20th century. It was the first time the word feminism was ever brought up and the ideas were spoken and shared amongst women. It began in the United Kingdom when women were becoming more politically active. During this first wave of feminism, the Women’s Suffrage Movement started. Women wanted the right to vote and take place in political office. Some people felt that women were naturally kinder, more temperate, and more worried about weaker participants of society, like children, which sent the movement for the right to...

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