Visible Signs Of Puritan Decay Essay

967 words - 4 pages

In times of Puritan society, the Ministers ruled with an iron fist as it portrays. No adultery, No drinking of vile drinks, and other stuff considered as a sin in the society has been outlawed. Stuff such as violations of the Sabbath and swearing and sleeping during sermons and also with businesses, abusing the lawyer system has been growing. Since the times of Puritan, society has been spiraling down hill fast in faith and morality.

In the Puritan days, sleeping and swearing during sermons were considered disrespect to the Minister that was preaching. Of course it didn't help that the Minister preached about hell and brimstone and was monotone. Also the pews in the church were uncomfortable and the backs were high up. When the Minister stepped up on his high podium that overlooked the congregation, he was able to see if people were paying attention or nodding off. In today's society if people nod off, or get distracted and start talking to the person next to them, the Minister doesn't say anything. Regarding early Puritan sermons, ministers have slacked off on enforcing the "no sleeping" rule. As time progressed they seemed to move toward the idea "if I get to at least one person in the congregation, I have done my job." Of course back then, if the Minister caught somebody sleeping, they would be punished severely and then after that they would be watched like a hawk. But now days, the Minister just ignores the distractions in the congregation even if it gets louder and more noticeable as I have seen in today's churches and congregations. The Puritans I guess just gave up as people started to move to other religions. But even then other religions have the same problem; paying attention in services. I myself am at fault to this problem too. When I have gone to service and sat there, and I didn't have enough sleep; I struggle to stay awake and listen. And then it's sometimes the Ministers fault. We all know some have more experience and more ability to preach than others, but you can't help it when a Minister is giving his sermon and he is talking in monotone and the sermon itself is not really an attention grabber. Then there is the thing about swearing. Back then people would get wiped if they swear. Even out of service. Today it's not accepted in the family but when in the public eye and especially with friends, all kinds of words come out. At least people have respect enough not to swear in the middle of service or in church for that matter. But the problem is when they get out of church, they start...

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