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Vlad Dracula: Origin Of The Vampire By Bram Stoker

1604 words - 6 pages

It has been nearly one hundred and seventeen years since Bram Stoker published his ground breaking novel entitled “Dracula” and only twenty-two years since the movie “Bram Stoker’s Dracula”, a film based upon the novel, was unleashed upon the world. The book and the movie were a success and influenced the creation of a genre that still is seen today in pop culture. Though many raved about the story, no one ever explored the source of this fantastical tale of blood shed. To understand where his inspiration took flight, one would have to look back five hundred and eighty-three years ago, when a notorious Romanian prince inflicted fear upon the masses. Vlad III, also known as Vlad Tepes or Vlad the Impaler, was a ruthless warrior with an intense blood lust and the sort of person Stoker would have drawn from to create his masterpiece. In exploring why Vlad would make such a likely candidate for Stoker, one need only take a peek into his blood-stained past and it would become quite clear.

His legend began in Transylvania in the year 1431. The second son of Vlad II was born within Romania during the winter months in the fortress of Sighisoara (Fasulo). Vlad III along with his two brothers, Mircea and Radu, had pleasant childhoods considering they were sons of nobility. When Vlad III was just five years old he joined an apprenticeship for knighthood in which he learned combat skills and the art of warfare that were paramount in becoming a knight during this era (Fasulo). His father was also part of an elite group know as the Order of the Dragon. He was so entranced by the Order that he even took the dragon to his name and became Vlad Dracul and Vlad III used the sobriquet “Dracula” which means “The son of Dracul” (Fasulo).The Order had brought great power to him, but when he decided to be neutral during Turkey’s invasion of Transylvania, he was forced out of Wallachia which he had claim to its throne at the time. With the help of the Sultan in 1443, he was able to regain the throne as long as he swore his loyalty to the Sultan and gave him massive tributes. To prove such loyalty, in 1444 he sent his youngest sons Radu and Vlad III to Istanbul as hostages where they were held for many years in Turkish captivity (Fasulo).

Many have argued that during such time Vlad III, or Vlad Dracula, grew to not only hate the Turks but also became the ruthless warrior he is so known for. When Dracula gained the throne of Wallachia in 1448, the Sultan let it slip that Dracula’s father and older brother had been tortured and buried alive by a rival Christian warrior known as John Hunyadi (Fasulo). Dracula was ultimately forced by Hunyadi to relinquish the throne, though he would again regain the throne in a strategic move that landed him back in power. In 1453, when Constantinople fell to Islam, the Christian world was shaken and as a result John Hunyadi began planning another attack against the Turks. In 1456 while Hunyadi was busy invading the Turks, Dracula saw...

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