This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Voter Participation In The United States

728 words - 3 pages

The United States is an inspiration of liberty and hope for nations around the world. It is a nation with citizens who have the unalienable rights of, “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness,” and a model for how democratic nations should be ordered and maneuvered due to its intrinsic values that are held. Democracy is a system of government where the citizens are responsible for shaping their nation to represent who they are and what they stand for. The people have the ultimate power in the nation. However, as no pure direct democracy exists in any nation, an indirect democracy arises, where people vote to elect representatives, who then in turn make the greater part of decisions for the nation.
From its early period, the United States has obtained an indirect type of democracy, and has always had contentment that its citizens are allowed to vote for their representatives, especially the President. Nevertheless, the amount of citizens that actually vote in nationwide elections has decreased noticeably over the years. Voter participation and turnout has been declining in the United States throughout history. Voter turnout, the percentage of eligible individuals who actually vote (Ginsberg), to this day is lower than it was in the 1900’s. Since 1912, presidential elections have only had about 50 to 65 percent of Americans participate. This means that about half of United States citizens who are eligible and have the freedom to vote have failed to participate in presidential elections. At the end of the nineteenth century voter turnout started plummeting, reaching the 60 percent level by the election of 1912 (Teixeira, 1987). The declining rate of voter participation in the United States is due to voter registration and procedures, formal obstacles, efforts by political institutions to mobilize people, weak political parties, the socioeconomic status of citizens, and the electoral system.
One explanation for low levels of voter participation is due to the registration, procedures, and obstacles citizens must persevere through to vote in a national election. In other nations, citizens aren’t obligated to register in order to vote. They are automatically registered due to their citizenship. While the United...

Find Another Essay On Voter Participation in the United States

How does Public Opinion influence participation both within the United States and Mexico?

2033 words - 9 pages their position. It is in this social context of abortion sparring in which interestingly enough both the United States and Mexico find themselves today. Public participation in both the United States and Mexico is shaped by the division between the religious and secularists, is affected by gender/ socioeconomic conditions, and has important effects on party participation. When the case of Roe v. Wade decidedly passed in 1973, the political and

Hispanics In The United States Essay

1253 words - 6 pages . (Dominicans are a mix of mostly Spanish and African?they are harder to ?set apart? from other Hispanics). Dominican immigrants have a long way to go in the process of political participation; there are no Dominicans in the U.S. House of Representatives as of yet. However, there are signs of improvement in this area; over 2 dozen Dominican Americans are elected as council members, county legislators, and state legislatures throughout the United States. As with all other Hispanic groups, Dominican Americans are seemingly highly religious. Their religion of choice is also Roman Catholic, as are the Cuban Americans.

The United States in Decline

2366 words - 9 pages One of the most vigorous debates focuses on the current status of the United States hegemony and whether or not it is in decline. This begs the question, if the United States is indeed declining in status, will it still be an influential player or not? I argue that the United States is losing its prominent position as the hegemonic leader of the world, but will still remain an influential player in global politics in the following decades to

Homelessness in the United States

1474 words - 6 pages According to the National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness, “approximately 3.5 million people are homeless each year, while 36.3 million live in households without enough food.” This statistic only reflects the United States, and to many people, it just doesn’t make sense. For instance Alfredzine Black of the YWCA in Marion, Indiana says, “I don’t understand why we have so much poverty in the richest country in the world

Immigration in the United States

1104 words - 4 pages The United States has often been referred to as a global “melting pot” due to its assimilation of diverse cultures, nationalities, and ethnicities. In today’s society, this metaphor may be an understatement. Between 1990 and 2010, the number of foreign born United States residents nearly doubled from 20 million to 40 million, increasing the U.S. population from almost 250 million to 350 million people. With U.S. born children and grandchildren

Divorce in the United States

1250 words - 5 pages only 6 weeks -- and file for divorce on grounds ofmental cruelty.Popular attitudes toward divorce changed as the United Statesbecame more urbanized and less religious. The increasingacceptance of divorce was reflected in court interpretations ofexisting laws and in new legislation enacted by the states. Twotendencies merged, making possible the establishment of new andeasier grounds for divorce. The focus of state divorce, whichpreviously concerned

Poverty in the United States

1004 words - 5 pages It certainly seems peculiar how so much disparity exists among the haves and have-nots in the country that leads the free world. The high level of poverty in the United States coupled with the disparaging rates of income are at times hard to comprehend. How can a country of such great wealth and power also be a country of vast poverty? Poverty will always be evident in the United States to some extent. However, minimizing poverty and income

Microaggression in The United States

2414 words - 10 pages United states has come a long way to try to end racism, one cannot ignore the fact that it still exists. It is something that may seem invisible in society, but everybody knows that it still thrives and that it’s racial attitudes affect the way our society functions. One of these invisible forms of racism is called microagression. Microagression is the theory that certain interactions between different races can be interpreted as small acts of

Hospice in the United States

4457 words - 18 pages Hospice in the United States Hospice is a concept of caring borrowed from medieval times, where travelers, pilgrims and the sick, wounded or dying could find rest and comfort. The contemporary hospice offers a program of care to patients and families facing a life threatening illness encompassing medical, nursing, spiritual, and psychological care. It is more than a medical alternative, it is an attitude toward death and the process of dying

Immigration in the United States

1983 words - 8 pages Immigration is what has made America what it is today. An immigrant is a person who comes to a country to take up permanent residence. Everyone in the United States of America is an immigrant either moving here themselves or being directly related to someone who did. All of us came from different parts of the world even as far back as the Native Americans when they emigrated from Asia to the United States. Immigration is needed to grow America

Immigration in the United States

1338 words - 5 pages Latinos and Asians also came to America as immigrants. Immigration has helped the United States by giving a helping hand and providing a workforce to deal with America’s growing manufacturing economy. In 1880-1930 more than 27 million new immigrants came to America from Italy, Germany, Europe, Russia, England, Canada, Ireland, and Sweden. Apart from all these countries, Mexico is the largest immigration source country. Chinese and Indian immigrants

Similar Essays

Voter Id Laws In The United States

1600 words - 7 pages Voter ID laws in the United States have begun to create controversy since the beginning of its adaptations in the early 2000’s. Voter ID laws in the United States is a law that requires U.S. citizens to have a special form of identification in order to vote in an election. The idea with Voter ID laws is that the state must make sure that the laws do not pose any sort of burden on the voters. These laws have been proposed in order to stop voting

Importance Of Voter Id Laws In The United States

1384 words - 6 pages will require people to present a government issued photo ID before they are allowed to vote, which is great because most people don’t know how easy it is to submit a ballot in another person’s name. In some of the states that don’t require a photo ID to vote all you have to do is state the other person’s name and the poll worker will check the name off and they will ask you to sign next to the name and then you are able to vote. Voter ID laws will

Improving Low Voter Turnout In The United States

670 words - 3 pages In our system of government we are privileged with the option to take part in the political process that runs the country. It is our right to vote that lets the people influence change in policy and set the guidelines that politicians must follow to be elected representatives. This precious ability, which is most coveted in most non-democratic countries, is taken for granted in our own. I believe that the low voter turnout in most

Causes Of Low Electoral Participation In The United States

805 words - 3 pages Causes of Low Electoral Participation in the United States In any Democracy, voter turnout is important as a measure of how truly democratic the election was, the more people that do vote, the more democratic the election. Yet America one of the largest democratic nations in the world still has a poor turnout. A survey conducted in 1983 concluded that America was twenty third out of twenty four nations in