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War On Drugs Essay

1196 words - 5 pages

Society’s view of drugs has vastly changed based on the sociological imagination of the times. Sociological imagination basically means that we are able to view ourselves as a part of one large group rather than individuals. Human’s behavior and attitude have evolved based on the social forces that have adjusted around them. This changing of ideas has been clearly apparent in the Americas and is a prime example of the prohibition of alcohol from 1920 to 1933. The illegality of alcohol provided the Mafia with an opportunity to produce liquor and therefore it had considerable control over those who wanted their alcohol and service. The part that the Mafia played in the 1920's has been developed into the drug dealers and drug cartel of this century. The justification they used to legalize alcohol under Amendment 21 in 1933 should be just cause to legalize most Narcotics today. With the legalization of Narcotics, many deaths related to drugs would decrease and the price would also decrease because big businesses could produce large amounts of Narcotics at less cost. Thus reducing crime that was once committed to support illegal drug habits.

Another drug that has played a large role in American society is Nicotine. For hundreds of years, cigarettes have been a very popular and legal drug within the United States. Only through research and education has the popularity and the use of cigarettes declined within the past decade. Physically, the actual consequences of using illegal Narcotics are much less than those of commonly used drugs like alcohol or cigarettes. Illegal Narcotics can and will be made safer than they currently are in the present system.

Economically, the production of drugs in the United States would greatly benefit the financial well being of the United States government and its population. Taxes should be placed immediately on Narcotics thus creating a brand new source of revenue for our dying economy. The more money that the government receives is more money that they can be added towards the educational programs on how Narcotics affect the human mind and body. Prohibition creates large amounts disrespect for law enforcement; these agencies that "should" be given the greatest respect of the American society. Money spent on prohibition is an increasingly overwhelming figure that is not needed and is obviously accomplishing very little. More than $51,000,000,000 dollars are spent on the American drug war only producing 1.55million arrests, of those arrests 749,825 are on Marijuana possession charges.

We now deal with alcohol abuse as a medical problem. Let us deal with the drug problem in the same way. The United States should not repeat the mistakes of the past by continuing to escalate a war that is totally unnecessary. The repeal of alcohol prohibition provides the perfect analogy. Repeal did not end alcoholism indeed Prohibition did not--but it did solve many of the problems created by Prohibition, such as corruption,...

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