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Wars In Afghanistan Essay

988 words - 4 pages

Kirandeep Kaur
Stephanie Martin
English 1A
March, 26 2014
Afghanistan
Many countries disagree on different aspects which lead to wars. One of the countries that have been fighting for religious dominance is Afghanistan. In December 1979, Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan and took control over it. Consequently within ten years, countries such as United States, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia, provided anti-communist trained forces that helped Afghanistan in ejecting the Soviet control. As the war continued, a major Islamic organization that is referred as Taliban achieved to confiscate most of Afghanistan.
Soviet Union entered Afghanistan planning to establish an important standing in Asia, one with trade possibilities and access to Gulf oil, Barnett Rubin said in his book, “The Fragmentation of Afghanistan” (PBS). After Soviet Union forced military and social modifications in Afghanistan, it affected the relations with other sectors and began to make rivals within different areas of native population. They started land reforms that concerned ethnic leaders. Soviet Union applied economic measures that made the situation worst for lower class people and tried to limit national risings by major arrests, tortures, killing of protestors and aerial attacks. According to Public Broadcasting Service, during this period, around one million people died in Afghanistan and more than eight thousand people were murdered after being placed on trial between the years of 1980 and 1988. This led to opposition by a group named Mujahadeen also known as guerilla forces, who was supported by United States. Mujahadeen are people who considered themselves ‘Islamic Warriors” or Afghanistan’s freedom fighters. In 1988, Soviet Union removed its forces from Afghanistan after the orders of Mikhail Gorbachev, a leader of Soviet Union.
The withdrawal of the Soviet Union forces from Afghanistan in 1989, gave rise to an immense power vacuum that was fulfilled by the commanders of the Mujahadeen. Thus, the country became helpless to a power struggle between the Mujahadeen commanders, who wanted to maintain and increase their authority in their regions. Under the Mujahadeen, the nation experienced great levels of corruption, political instability and bloodshed. The civil war had a tremendous effect on the people of Afghanistan, who were exhausted by the continuous violence and ended sufferings. The Mujahadeen’s exploitation of the Afghani land and its people was challenged by the Taliban (PBN). The original members of the Taliban were Talib or Islamic students that gained there religious knowledge at madrassas. The Taliban chose Mullah Omar as their absolute leader, who would lead them militarily, politically and spiritually. Mullah Omar was familiar and sympathetic to the sufferings of the Afghani people under the Soviets and the Mujahadeen. In 1996 when Taliban gained control of Afghanistan, it gave rise to one of the most authoritarian and harsh regime for women...

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