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Welfare Reform In America Essay

1460 words - 6 pages

Welfare ReformWelfare as seen by conservative America is a hand out to the poor. It createsa cycle wherein children of families on welfare continue dependency on thewelfare their parents depended on to raise them. But, is conservative Americasetting the blame on the right shoulders? Are there enough adequate living-wagejob opportunities to take care of America's poverty stricken masses?Will the cycle of poverty end with a poor, single mother working a job atMcDonalds to support her children instead of gaining welfare benefits? Ianswer no to all these question and firmly believe that welfare reform isheading toward a major catastrophe.The current large number of people on welfare is not due to the lazinessof the poor but to three major factors:1) The top heavy distribution wealth in the U. S.of A. today.2) The amount of teenage pregnancies and children born into poverty, or potential poverty situations.3)Schooling systems must change to accommodate the work forces needs.These are definately not the only factors affecting welfare, but in my mind arethe major factors. I will also discuss a couple of my ideas for making fundsavailable for families that need it.Firstly, the distribution of wealth in the U.S. is astonishingly top heavy.Considering all assets, in 1989 the richest one percent of the populationcontrols 39 percent of America's total household wealth. Whereas in financialwealth alone the top one percent controls 48 percent. Also, in regards toincome, The top one percent garners 8-9 percent of total income(1).This gap continues to grow between the rich and middle to poor netwealth and income. The new American aristocracy pushes down wages formiddle and lower class Americans, creating more of a need for governmenthelp programs such as welfare. However, new reforms cut benefits andwill require a large number of unskilled workers to enter the work force.Current trends toward corporate downsizing, diminishing need for unskilledwork in the manufacturing sector, and American companies going abroad toseek a cheaper workforce do not bode well for a newly cut off welfarebeneficiary.The government proposals declare that states are responsible for designingprograms to deal with people cut off or on welfare. States unable to findjobs for welfare recipients in the private sector will be forced to createcommunity service jobs and the like to support the jobless. This will createa drain on state budgets and force state tax raises to create jobs that areeventually devoid of worth to the community at large because of the steadilyincreasing numbers of workers entering such jobs. Hence one would have thesame dilemma; instead of welfare recipients 'sitting around at home' theywould be sitting around at work.The problem of a high number of children being born into poverty and potentialpoverty must be reduced to diminish the number of people requiring welfare.Education and availability of birth control is the key here. Maybe, ifmiddle and high school age kids...

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