Were Stalin’s Brutal Methods A Successor To Lenin’s Brutality Or Was The Terror He Perpetrated Unique At The Time?” By Osama Arif Ishaque

2790 words - 11 pages

On the eve of the October 1917 revolution in Russia, tensions had built up tremendously against Kerensky and the provisional government over its various decisions, (including the decision to keep Russia fighting against the Germans in world war one instead of pulling out). In the forefront of this revolutionary movement was one, Vladamir Illiyich Lenin, the leader of the Bolsheviks who had led them this far to victory by appealing to the masses with a simple slogan, "land, peace and bread," giving them genuine hope for the future. Having come to power in October 1917 by means of a coup d'état, Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks spent the next few years struggling to maintain their rule against widespread popular opposition. They had overthrown the provisional democratic government and were inherently hostile to any form of popular participation in politics. In the name of the revolutionary cause, they employed ruthless methods to suppress real or perceived political enemies. However for all of Lenin's good and patriotic qualities, when in power, he displayed a side which the people had not, seen in which Lenin was a more of totalitarian dictator than a fair leader of a country that had undergone a proletarian revolution. The small, elite group of Bolshevik revolutionaries which formed the core of the newly established Communist Party dictatorship under Lenin ruled by decree, enforced with terror. Lenin was responsible for enforcing terror upon his own people and controlling almost every aspect of their lives which is proved by many situation such as the virtual starvation of the red army which he decreed prior to demobilization after the civil war, or the Cheka requisitioning squads which reigned terror throughout the country side.Moreover Lenin successor, Stalin was no different as he perpetrated just as much, or more, terror than Lenin by way of the great show trials and purges of the 30's and the persecution of the minorities and intelligentsia. However it has to be said that the terror Stalin unleashed, though might have resulted in a greater loss of life, but was not unique or the first time it was ever tried Lenin was the first to set up the concentration camps, (gulags), which Stalin later expanded. Lenin was also the first to destroy all democratic institutions in the country, replacing them with his totalitarian dictatorship of the communist party. He was also the first to persecute the minorities and the intelligentsia and thus the question, were Stalin's brutal methods a successor to Lenin's brutality or was the terror he perpetrated unique at the time? Lenin, the great leader of the Bolsheviks, was a very pragmatic man, always sticking to the practical realities in life. He only cared about results and not the way by which these results were obtained, thus for Lenin, the results justified the means of getting there. As can be seen from evidence uncovered in recent years from declassified documents in the KGB archives,...

Find Another Essay On Were Stalin’s Brutal Methods A Successor To Lenin’s Brutality Or Was The Terror He Perpetrated Unique At The Time?” By Osama Arif Ishaque

To what extent were the ideals of young Australian soldiers shattered by the reality of their experiences at Gallipoli? Was anything salvaged from such a military disaster?'

933 words - 4 pages impression of romanticism in the Australian sense of isolation. For them, war was an opportunity to travel and see the world. Many men also felt bound by the call of mateship. A sense of duty to help their friends and defend Britain. To ignore this was simply desertion. These ideals were greatly challenged by the horrific realities that confronted the Anzacs upon their landing at Gallipoli.From the moment they set foot on the shores of Anzac cove, the

"The War in Iraq: What do you Believe!?" This paper was written about a year into the war, and at the time many people were arguing about the oil and Saddam issue.

1064 words - 4 pages On March 20, 2003, the United States, after a large build up of troops, attacked Iraq. The United States, after a decade of diplomatic disete and lies by Iraq, had finally ran out of nonmilitary methods of getting Iraq to obey UN decries including admission of and destruction of all weapons of mass destruction. I feel that the United States was justified in taking the actions they did due to many reasons that will be explained throughout this

Me and My Bestie. This essay was written on a personal experience level. We were to pick a conflict and look at all the possible outcomes.

2141 words - 9 pages I have been best friend with Amy for almost six years. The bond between the two of us is so deep at times it's scary. It even reached a point where I knew what she was thinking before she had a chance to say anything out loud. We were constantly together having a great time! Often people who met us together thought we were sisters and confused our names. In a weird sense we were sisters, minus the DNA connection. It's odd, things had been this

"My father worked at ford. He hated it – it was just like school or prison." Discuss the above statement focusing on the ideas of Michel Foucault.

1208 words - 5 pages at was stolen from every employee. Prisoners in jail have no control over their scheduling so therefore it can be argued that workers were being treaded like prisoners. The Panoptical was a design build by J.Benthem. This was a new design that was purposely used for prisons. The design was made in such a way that it was possible for prison officers to view all prison cells while being situated in one place. The design was based around two

Perversion of nature. Comparing the ideal of science and nature at the time Rappaccini's daughter was written by Nathaniel Hawthorne

1472 words - 6 pages developed.Yet, as time passed, and a certain few dedicated towards the science toiled, technology increased. What was first thought to be impossible suddenly was a reality. Everything was now explained in Natural terms and the world became rational and logical on its own terms. Gone went any need for the Supernatural, and forgotten were the human's limits.The human could achieve anything, create anything, and discover anything with his intelligence

Did females once dominate the world? Were they considered to be above men at one time? Comparison to "The Epic of Gilgamesh."

987 words - 4 pages , he realized the nature of males on earth was to die, not to give birth or live forever. Determined, he goes on a journey in search of mortality. He went to find Utnapishtim, the only faraway hope of everlasting life. He travels to the mountain Mashu, because this was considered the source of life. He goes there, hoping god created male in his image. He meets female-scorpions* at the entrance and they tell him: "No man born of any woman has ever

Why by the 1830's, was the continuation of convict transportation to the Australian colonies under increasing scrutiny, and what arguments and interests were at stake in this debate?

1641 words - 7 pages By the late eighteenth century, Britain was no stranger to the process of colonisation. However from Captain Cook's first arrival at Botany Bay until the complete reprieve of the Hulks Act in 1850, successive British governments would experiment with a revolutionary style of colonisation called 'Convict Transpotation'. This would see over 115,000 convicts being transported to the two colonies of New South Wales and Van Diemans Land, in an effort

Review of American Policy regarding the War on Terror in Afghanistan and Iraq. Predominant sources were Bob Woodward's "Plan of Attack" and "Bush at War."

1955 words - 8 pages instincts, is a gut player and never has any doubts. Despite Powell's apparent apprehension to conflict, the president forced the pace, made the right choices even if they went against his prior rhetoric, and kept the country together. By this account, he was an effective leader.The war in Afghanistan is something of an anomaly where the act of war is concerned in that the initial weapons were suitcases full of currency. This isn't the only

What was the difference between 19th century conservatives, liberals, and socialists, and how did it afect the world at that time

1042 words - 4 pages was the view that had been predominant throughout history up to this time. It was a view that looked with horror at the political and social unrest caused by the new ideals that had found a following among those people of less than noble blood. Conservatives believed in the inequality of human beings. They supported a government where there was a head of state, usually a king, who had most if not all of the power over the country and the people

"Why was unity such an important issue at the time the play was written? Does your reading of the first act of the play leave you with an impression of unity?"

545 words - 2 pages In the first act of the play, we start in an antechamber in King Henry's palace. The bishop's are discussing the change in Henry's character from a wild man to a model king. Canterbury hopes to persuade Henry against the new law by giving him Church money and supporting England's claim to France. Unity was an important issue at the time this play was written because of the battles being fought. Strength in numbers was one of the most important

History of the Canadian Pacific Railroad If the railroad had not been built at the time that it was, the Americans instead of Canadians would have capitalized on the vaste wealth of the prairies.

1090 words - 4 pages railroad had to be built connecting British Columbia with Montreal (Lamb, 1984, p.3). The distance between British Columbia and Montreal was so great that a transcontinental railroad was the only option available at the time to secure the western connection from the United States. In Upper Canada the last good lands were taken up by about 1855 (Lamb, 1985, p.8). This meant that there was a growing concern in the population regarding the expansion

Similar Essays

What Were Hitler's Core Ideas Or Assumptions? What Were The Methods Used To Implement Them Once He And The Nazi's Had Established The Nazi State In Germany?

692 words - 3 pages him recognized. From the first time he spoke at a German Workers' Party meeting people took notice. When Hitler spoke you would listen. This of course helped in his own rise to power and also that of the NSDAP in later years. His speeches were filled with emotions, power and conviction. It can be argued that good timing was an additional factor. Hitler used surrounding events to spread his propaganda, to his advantage. He did this with great

Write An Analysis On 'ode To A Nightingale', Focusing On How Keats Presents Some Of The Ideas He Was Struggling With At The Time.

1640 words - 7 pages happiness and sorrow; can pleasure be so intense that it numbs us or causes us pain? At the beginning of the ode, the bird is presented to us as a real bird, but as the poem progresses, the bird becomes a symbol for the beauties of nature and the ideal world. In the opening of the poem, a sense of sluggish weightiness is suggested by the heavy, almost thudding, alliterative sounds produced by the repetition of 'd' ("drowsy", "drunk", "dull

Blade Runner Question: Suppose That The Voigt Kampff Test Did Not Exist And That There Were No Methods To Tell If Someone Were Human Or Replicant. Would That Mean That A Given Replicant Was Indeed...

1358 words - 5 pages Blade RunnerQuestion: Suppose that the Voigt-Kampff test did not exist and that there were no methods to tell if someone were human or replicant. Would that mean that a given replicant was indeed fully human?The film Blade Runner directed by Ridley Scott, is based on the science fiction novel by Phillip K. Dick entitled Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Set in the a dystopian Los Angeles, in the year 2019, main character Rick Deckard

Blade Runner Question: Suppose That The Voigt Kampff Test Did Not Exist And That There Were No Methods To Tell If Someone Were Human Or Replicant. Would That Mean That A Given Replicant Was Indeed...

1358 words - 5 pages Blade RunnerQuestion: Suppose that the Voigt-Kampff test did not exist and that there were no methods to tell if someone were human or replicant. Would that mean that a given replicant was indeed fully human?The film Blade Runner directed by Ridley Scott, is based on the science fiction novel by Phillip K. Dick entitled Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Set in the a dystopian Los Angeles, in the year 2019, main character Rick Deckard