What Manglish Signifies Essay

733 words - 3 pages

As globalisation increases, so does the loss of human languages. People find it easier to conduct business and communicate with those outside their own culture if they speak more widely used languages such as English, Chinese, or Hindi. Children are not being educated in languages spoken by a limited number of people. As fewer people use local languages, they gradually die out. Those who primarily speak one of the world's major languages may find it hard to understand what losing one's language can mean, and may even feel that the world would be better off if everyone spoke the same language. Endangered languages should be preserved because each and every single one embodies unique local knowledge of the cultures and natural systems in the region in which it is spoken.Manglish (Malay + English) is the colloquial version of the English language as spoken in Malaysia; it may not be a proper language, but it is one all the same.Malaysian English has its own historical roots and boundaries. We can trace it back to the time when the British had slowly consolidated their hold on the Malay states in the aftermath of Francis Light's arrival in Penang in 1786. Since then English has been going through different stages of prosperity, decline and revival in Malaysia depending on many factors.Malaysia is a pluralistic country in the full sense of the word: it is multi-racial, multi-lingual, multi-cultural, and multi-religious. Three main races and no less than 70 indigenous languages, most of which are not recorded yet. A nation with diverse ethnic and linguistic groups can't hope to function well in its day to day affairs if her people are not able to establish a relationship that is mutually intelligible. A relationship that reflects the existence of a mutually intelligible system of communication requires a language that is common to all. English was found to serve some communicative needs of the different communities, each of which utilise it in their respective ways. Code-switching has become a feature of spoken communication in the society as a result of this; it occurs when an individual who is bilingual alternates between two languages during his/her speech with another...

Find Another Essay On What Manglish Signifies

charant Creon as the Main Character of Antigone

1231 words - 5 pages stop his suffering. He poetically states in the play, "Come, thou most welcome Fate, Appear, O come; Bring my days' final date, Fill up their sum! Come quick, I pray; Let me not look upon another day!" (51). So with all this suffering, one might ask what the purpose of such a depressing play might be, or what lesson Sophocles attempts to teach us. This brings up the concept of morality. Creon did not get out of this sticky situation without

Free Macbeth Essays: Sleep and Sleeplessness

525 words - 2 pages The Sleep and Sleeplessness Motif in Macbeth We have consciences that function to tell us the difference between right and wrong. If we have clear consciences, we usually possess the ability to sleep. But when our consciences are full of guilt, we experience a state of sleeplessness. In Macbeth, Shakespeare uses the sleep and sleeplessness motif to represent Macbeth's and Lady Macbeth's consciences and the effect Macbeth's conscience has on

Life Outside of Life in Hawthorne’s Wakefield

898 words - 4 pages Life Outside of Life in Hawthorne’s Wakefield   Efficacy lies at the heart of human desires for immortality. Characters throughout literature and art are depicted as wanting to step aside and see what their world would be like without their individual contributions. The literary classic A Christmas Carol and the more recent, but ageless, film It’s Wonderful Life both use outside influences (three ghosts and Clarence the Angel

Essay on Identity in Song of Solomon

2172 words - 9 pages Searching for Identity in Song of Solomon         Abstract: Whether Africans really fly or just escape a monumental burden, perhaps only through death, is a decision Toni Morrison has apparently left to her readers. Never the less, no matter what you believe, within Song of Solomon, the suggestion is, that in order to "fly" you must go back to the beginning, back to your roots. You must learn the "art" from the old messages.   O

The Character of Oedipus in Oedipus and The Infernal Machine

904 words - 4 pages revealing her true self, the Sphinx asks what it is that Oedipus ultimately seeks in life. Oedipus answers, "I'm not sure. I know that I like stamping crowds, trumpets, banners, palm branches waving, the sun, the gold and purple, happiness, luck. . .life!" (Cocteau, Inferna l Machine, p44.) In saying this, readers are left with the impression that he covets the life of the rich and powerful, yet he is not interested in involving himself with the other

Okonkwo's Tragic Flaws in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

3121 words - 12 pages of a personality flaw. While fate does in deed lend a hand in events surrounding a tragic hero, there must be some element of free choice available to the character. According to Smith, "the tragic hero falls because he chooses one course of action over another" (1). The hero must understand through increased awareness what went wrong before "he comes to his end." Additionally, in the case of a tragic figure, the punishment must exceed the crime

Sophocles' Antigone - Antigone Must Challenge Creon

889 words - 4 pages their recent civil war, also must rally the patriotism of his people. While he, too, praises the loyalty of his people, he does two other things to rally the citizens: he emphasizes his own qualifications for leadership, and he reminds them what happens to traitors.     Creon speaks to his people at the beginning of Antigone because he is now the only ruler of Thebes, and he wants them to be loyal to him. He knows there's a chance they might

The Role of Women in Homer’s Iliad

796 words - 3 pages her son Achilles is his quest for glory, her motives are very different from his and provide a glimpse to the reader of what the male characters lack. Thetis is always motivated by her love and pity for her son, two emotions he seems unable to feel himself. As a loving mother, she is concerned for her son and his future and so ensures that he is aware of his options. Out of respect for him, she allows Achilles to make his own decision and goes

A Comparison of Butler's Life and Kindred

1915 words - 8 pages A Comparison of Butler's Life and Kindred   What lies in the mind of an author as he or she begins the long task of writing a fiction novel? This question can be answered if the author's life is studied and then compared to the work itself. Octavia E. Butler's life and her novel Kindred have remarkable comparisons. This essay will point out important events of Butler's life and how they link to the mentioned novel. Octavia Estelle

Pillars of Metaphorical Ambiguity in The Scarlet Letter

1439 words - 6 pages names.  The four pillars supporting this novel are all cloaked with foreshadowing names, which silently clue the reader into what traits and significance the character holds as the story unfolds.  These pillars that solidify the novel are Hester Prynne, Roger Chillingworth, Arthur Dimmesdale, and Pearl.              The first, possibly strongest column supporting the evolution of themes in the novel is Hester Prynne.  Hester is the young woman

An Analysis of Robert Ji-Song Ku's Leda

2003 words - 8 pages attracted by what he did not have, just as Sorin is attracted by what he does not have; the mythical Leda was a beautiful mortal, and Sorin draws a parallel between the two by saying that his Leda, "the woman without whom I cannot live, was merely from Cheju Island" (281). Secondly, he pursues her: as Zeus pursues Leda but cannot attract her, Sorin pursues his Leda but is unsure of how to attract her. Just like Zeus, he tries a seductive, mysterious

Similar Essays

Reality And Illusion In Shakespeare's Hamlet Reality, Appearance And Deception

896 words - 4 pages Reality and Illusion in Hamlet   Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet, begins with the appearance of a ghost, an apparition, possibly a hallucination. Thus, from the beginning, Shakespeare presents the air of uncertainty, of the unnatural, which drives the action of the play and develops in the protagonist as a struggle to clarify what only seems to be absolute and what is actually reality. Hamlet's mind, therefore, becomes the central force of the

Sub Plots In Hamlet Essay

1118 words - 4 pages , and the relationship between Hamlet and Ophelia. These three sub-plots are crucial to making Hamlet the master piece that it is. In the times that Shakespeare lived ghosts were a readily accepted idea, but one had to be wary of them because it was difficult to decipher a good ghost from a bad one. Horatio, Hamlet’s best friend, first brings that question into our mind when the Ghost is asking Hamlet to follow it. Horatio warned: What if it

Hamlet As Victim And Hero Essay

1301 words - 5 pages grave. Hamlet was just a prince who, against his will, was pulled into this situation by chance, and it was left in his hands to justify his father's death. He did what he had to do according to his own manner.   Works Cited The Holy Bible. Authorized King James Version. Salt Lake City: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1989. Dodsworth, Martin. Hamlet Closely Observed. New Hampshire: The Athlone Press, 1985

Essay On Light And Dark In Antigone

1188 words - 5 pages . Throughout Antigone, King Creon is a symbol for nomos, while Antigone stands on the side of physis. To portray these ideas, light and dark images are used as a recurring motif to reinforce the theme. Light is used to show something good that is happening, whereas dark is utilized to show something of which the gods disapprove. Following with tradition, this play uses light to portray what is right in the eyes of the chorus and darkness to reproach the