The Law On Demonstrations Of Rights

726 words - 3 pages

Occupied the law on demonstrations attention of many individuals in the current period . Where abounded preparation demonstrations and became demonstrations factional does not represent all sides , but represent a few , which led to the government taking a decision to pass a law to pretend to reduce these demonstrations , which have become the only solution and the shelter first to turn to any even individual gain their rights without regard to the rights of other individuals. And pressure on the government to accept his demands and only spread chaos . And that it led to a split society into two parties . First party in accordance with the law on demonstrations to reduce riots and chaos and make the wheel production going and push the economy forward. And the other side shows to the law on demonstrations where he thinks he suppression of freedoms and return again to the dark age and inability to express their views again.

Has issued a law on demonstrations to maintain the rights of the parties , it is the right of the first party to enjoy a safe and quiet life in order to help him on this work and progress of the country without finding who stop the performance of his work . And for the other party is entitled also to demonstrate and to express his opinion, but in the scope of the peace and maintain and facilities not to sabotage it and without that infringe or encroach on the rights of the first party and as stipulated in Article VII of the law on demonstrations and are " prohibited from participating in public processions and demonstrations or breach of security , public order or production or calling him or disable the interests of citizens or harm them or exposing them to danger or to prevent the exercise of their rights or their actions or influence the course of justice at or banditry"

Spread several demonstrations after the events of Tunisia , and called it " peaceful demonstrations " , by raising the flags of that country who get it, suggest them patriotism , then took place after the demonstrations in Egypt and Libya , and took a pass on the infection to other countries , but the reality is that they even...

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