What Were The Key Factors To The Evolution Of The Chesapeake Region?

970 words - 4 pages

The Chesapeake region reached such high heights after such an unfamiliar and unfortunate beginning because of various changes in population, the economy, and household composition.
From 1630 to 1800, the demography of the Chesapeake region incessantly changed. One key factor that contributed to the sporadic changes in population was the mortality rates. In the Chesapeake region, the age at which people died became younger as time went by. Document 7 proves the increasing mortality rate by showing that the average of Chesapeake-born men who reached age 20, born between 1670 to 1679, lived longer than those born in later years such as 1720 to 1729. Although people died younger as the years passed, the population continuously grew. For instance, the average population of whites in the Chesapeake region in 1640 was about 3,901, but in 1770 the population grew to an mean of approximately 133,180 whites, around 34 times more than that of 1640. However, the arrival and settling of British migrants largely contributed to the flourishing population of the Chesapeake region. Religious tolerance or religious heterogeneity, especially in Maryland, could have been one element that may have influenced more British migrants to travel to the Chesapeake region. Document 4 shows that in the years 1630 to 1640, approximately 21.9 to 24.6 percent of all British migrants went to the Chesapeake region. By 1690 to 1700, migrants that went to the Chesapeake region increased to about 15,800 to 16,000 out of 44,100, or 35.8 to 33.0 percent. Some migrants became indentured servants to pay for their transportation to the colonies. However, with the rise and growth of plantations, servants gradually became replaced with slaves, as shown on document 10. As the demand for slaves grew, so did their population. According to documents 1, 2, and 3, in 1640 there were about 79 blacks, but by 1770, blacks dramatically increased in number to an average of 84340, about 1068 times more in number than in 1640.
Another factor that contributed to the evolution of the Chesapeake society was the growing economy. The slave trade was a significant part of the economy. Document 9 is a chart that displays the "English Slave Imports to America." Between 1762 to 1780, the southern mainland received approximately 20 percent of imported slaves. However, the slave trade wasn't the only industry that strengthened the economy. Due to the increase of slaves being traded into the Chesapeake region, the tobacco industry thrived. Document 14, for instance, shows that in 1659 the average price of Maryland-grown tobacco was 1.65 pence sterling, or GPX, per pound, but in 1710, the price decreased to 0.85 pence sterling per pound. The drop in prices reveals that tobacco became more common and readily available. The Chesapeake region even exported it to England....

Find Another Essay On What were the Key Factors to the Evolution of the Chesapeake Region?

The Chesapeake Region and The New England Region Colonies

1586 words - 6 pages strong and upholding pact among them (Document D) whereas the Englishmen who settled in Virginia and such were there only to satisfy their infinite greed (Document F). The families in New England resulted in a great sense of unity within each colony by what Winthrop stated in Document A or the colonists being a part of a tightly knit community. The great lack of unity between the colonists in the Chesapeake region is evident the events that occur

What Were the Key Issues Leading To the Civil War?

2365 words - 9 pages ’ speeches and letters being difficult to understand, because leading up to the Civil War both the North and the South paid close attention to what the commissioners had to say. According to Dew these documents had important information pertaining to the Civil War, in the late nineteenth century when the War Department editors were assembling a documentary record of the war, they included extensive coverage of the commissioners’ works in the

Settlers and Differences in the New England and Chesapeake Region of the US

845 words - 4 pages little interest in God, or religion in general. John Smith describes the lifestyle in the Chesapeake Region in his text History of Virginia (Doc F). Smith elaborates on how the people were consumed with trying to find gold (Doc F). This conveys how the settlers in the Chesapeake region were focus on profits than anything else. Smith describes the severity of the gold seeking with his statement, “There was no talk … but dig gold, wash gold, refine gold

'What were the factors that lead to the formation of the New Testament Canon? How valid are they today?'

1705 words - 7 pages There is said to be over a thousand years of literature in the Christian Bible as it is today. This essay will look at the New Testament of the Bible, what the factors were that lead to its formation and the validity of those factors.The Bible must be looked at not as a single book, but as a collection of twenty-seven books. These books as we have them today are not originals, they have been translated from copies of copies and as ancient

What were the real factors that led to the discreditation of Appeasement as a policy for foreign diplomacy?

927 words - 4 pages Appeasement was one of the most important causes of WWII. Today people say that it was Chamberlain's appeasement that started the war. It is true to some extent because Chamberlain couldn't prevent the war. However, Chamberlain had actually began thinking to change his policy after the Munich agreement; he was forced to change his appeasement policy because many events happened in 1938-1939. Let's see how the events affected Chamberlain's

The Gallipoli Gamble - What were the factors that led to it's failure?

1271 words - 5 pages wasted time deciding what to do, and The Turkish soldiers moved defenders into this new area where both sides were forced to dig trenches and settle down to slow trench warfare. In the event of Stopford's obvious failure, he was sent home to England.first attacks on Gallipoli were also badly planned failures, as on the 18th of March, a fleet of British battleships sailed into the Dardanelles to attack the Turkish forces, as the beach and coast

What were the decisive factors determining the outcome of the 2001 general election (UK)?

1133 words - 5 pages There were many factors contributing to the outcome of the 2001 general election, some more important than others. The decisive factors include media influence, dealignment, tactical voting, the leadership of parties, the performance of the government, the party's campaign and issue/judgmental voting.The media is an important factor in elections as it has influence over the voting public. It has become particularly more influential as

"The Crucible" by Arthur Miller- What were the factors that caused the play to escalate to such an intense level?

848 words - 3 pages Every year, many people are innocently killed or sent to prison. In these type of stories, a person is blamed or accused of doing something him or her have not done, and end up either dying or getting a prison sentence. In The Crucible, people are accused of being witches because of the situations and time period they are in. Their insecurity brought chaos upon them and many innocents died. There were many factors that caused what happened in

Fate and Free Will as Key Factors Leading to the Deaths of Romeo and Juliet

3230 words - 13 pages Fate and Free Will as Key Factors Leading to the Deaths of Romeo and Juliet In this report I will try to discuss in depth why I feel that fate and free will, were indeed a key factors leading to the deaths of young Romeo and Juliet in this Shakespearian play of love and tragedy. A consistent sense of foreboding is

What were the sources of the emerging Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and what key events in Germany brought the two sid

679 words - 3 pages Q8: What were the sources of the emerging Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and what key events in Germany brought the two sides to the brink of confrontation? Despite having been allies during World War II, shortly afterwards in the late 1940s the United States and the Soviet Union found themselves in a new type of war. A war against one another. The period was known as The “Cold War”, which was a rivalry between the two

What factors led to the outbreak of war in 1914?

2703 words - 11 pages The war that broke out in 1914 was one of the worst, if not the worst, wars in human history. It had left millions dead and a scar burned into European history forever. However, if we do not identify why war broke out in 1914, stopping others wars will be impossible. Clearly, we may never know the answer to this, but many sources give many interpretations. In this essay, I will try to recognise the key factors that led the outbreak of the Great

Similar Essays

The Two Regions Which Were Colonized: The Chesapeake Region And The New England Region

694 words - 3 pages many differences. In the Chesapeake region tobacco and rice were grown and harvested by African American slaves, while up in New England the settlers were forced into fishing and building ships. Little farming was done because of the infertile soil. The population was also different because of the many slaves in the south and lack-there-of in the north. Finally, the reasons for travelling across the ocean to land in America were completely

1993 Although New England And The Chesapeake Region Were Both Settled Largely By People Of English Origin, By 1700 The Regions Had Evolved Into Two Distinct Societies. Why Did This Difference In...

1082 words - 4 pages Isabel Olivas Eliason AP U.S. History 6 September 2014 The New World was a marvel and a chance to make it big in the 1600s. England took its gamble at building colonies in the unsettled region of what is now the east coast. It then was separated into two regions, New England and the Chesapeake. Even though they were both founded by the English, their differences in religion, unity, and motives evolved their societies into polar opposites. In New

Dbq 1993 Although New England And The Chesapeake Region Were Both Settled Largely By People Of English Origin, By 1700 The Regions Had Evolved Into Two Distinct Societies. Why Did This Difference In...

1082 words - 4 pages Isabel Olivas Eliason AP U.S. History 6 September 2014 The New World was a marvel and a chance to make it big in the 1600s. England took its gamble at building colonies in the unsettled region of what is now the east coast. It then was separated into two regions, New England and the Chesapeake. Even though they were both founded by the English, their differences in religion, unity, and motives evolved their societies into polar opposites. In New

English Settlers Of The Chesapeake Region And New England

930 words - 4 pages English Settlers of the Chesapeake Region and New England Although New England and the Chesapeake region were both settled largely by people of English origin, by 1700 the regions had evolved into two distinct societies. As English settlements in North America began to progress, social, economical, and religious ideas divided the English immigrants. The settlers journeyed to North America to meet their individual needs