Why Are Australians "Switching Off" From Politics?

1819 words - 7 pages

"Why are Australians 'Switching Off' from Politics?"
Introduction
In order to address this question in a meaningful way the questions must be asked which Australians are switching off from politics and if so which aspects of politics are they switching off from. What at first seems a simple question understates the complexity of Australian society and it’s political system. Using an institutionalist perspective on politics the premise of the question may be viewed as correct. Bean (1989) uses a narrow definition of orthodox politics, which is limited to campaigning, voting, communal activity and personalised contacting; however as Fyfe (2009 p37) contends that political participation is a contested term.
A review of articles around this topic will show there are great complexities in Australian politics and that Australian society which must be explored in order for this question to be addressed. There are a wide variety of factors why this is the case; examples include the complexity of the electoral system (Hill & Young 2007), demographic factors particularly the disengagement of youth from traditional politics (Fyfe 2009 p37). The large amount of informal votes is regarded as a sign of political disengagement, though the complexity of the electoral system must be considered as a contributing factor in informal voting. Pringle (2012) argues against the popular misconception that compulsory voting is an illusion in Australia.
This essay will examine the influence social, demographic and cultural factors on political participation; as well as that of the complexity of the electoral system. As well it will compare orthodox electoral politics and other forms political activism.
Orthodox Political Participation
Using sophisticated statistical analysis of orthodox political participation in Australia i.e. campaigning, voting, communal activity and personalised contacting (Bean 1989 pg 471-2) notes that when adequate controls are imposed the present study finds no effect at all for direction of partisanship at the individual level on any of the separate modes or on the overall measure of political participation; and in fact even the zero-order association between partisanship and participation is generally weak. In broad terms, therefore, neither major political party is likely to benefit at the expense of the other from differential rates of participation among different sections of the community in Australia. Similarly, religious denomination has little connection with activism in these data (save for a modest effect on electoral participation) Ethnic background is also somewhat surprising for its lack of effect. The image of the apolitical immigrant in the 1960s receives only scant endorsement from the current data. There is a narrowing of the gap in 'political awareness and involvement' between immigrants and native-born Australians from 1967 to 1979. It may be that the barriers to political participation felt by immigrants to Australia in a...

Find Another Essay On Why are Australians "Switching Off" from Politics?

Why Are the Good Allowed to Suffer? From Seneca's On Providence and The Bible

1541 words - 7 pages suicide as easy to accomplish if they did not condone its usage in some hard situations. This is clearly different from today’s Christian view on suicide, which is largely negative. While Seneca and writers in the Old Testament and New Testament of the Bible disagree about the reasons why higher beings allow humans to suffer, they all agree that suffering and hardships are always beneficial and advantageous to those who face them. In his

Human population are at risk from outbreaks of new diseases Are there reasons why modern humans might be more prone to infectious disease epidemic

1234 words - 5 pages Human population are at risk from outbreaks of new diseases Are there reasons why modern humans might be more prone to infectious disease epidemics, and where do these come from? According to WHO (World Health Organisation) 2004 approximately 75% of new emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic (i.e. derive from animals). WHO (2011) also listed HIV/AIDS, as one of the main causes of death in the past decade. We are more prone to infectious

Why are more people who are at risk of suffering losses from disasters (both natural and man-made) not insured against them, and what policies might increase the prevalence of insurance against...

1956 words - 8 pages Examination Number: B030015Course: Economics 2Course Organiser: Michael WattsDate of Submission: 30/01/2014Question Why are more people who are at risk of suffering losses from disasters (both natural and man-made) not insured against them, and what policies might increase the prevalence of insurance against catastrophic losses?Word Count: 1941IntroductionInsurance is the one of the world's oldest financial tools. Traders have practiced it since

Why are more people who are at risk of suffering losses from disasters (both natural and man-made) not insured against them, and what policies might increase the prevalence of insurance against...

1956 words - 8 pages Examination Number: B030015Course: Economics 2Course Organiser: Michael WattsDate of Submission: 30/01/2014Question Why are more people who are at risk of suffering losses from disasters (both natural and man-made) not insured against them, and what policies might increase the prevalence of insurance against catastrophic losses?Word Count: 1941IntroductionInsurance is the one of the world's oldest financial tools. Traders have practiced it since

Why are advertising campaigns for video games moving away from traditional platforms?

906 words - 4 pages Advertising campaigns for video games have gradually started to move away from the everyday routine of a couple of posters and TV advertisements because of the way the audience consume the media texts. The ways in which new platforms have changed the adverts are shown and consumed by the audiences can include; the transformation of consoles and how they have drastically changed the way other platforms advertise and how this industry repeatedly

Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and...

2151 words - 9 pages Tola Obembe L6CMTThe Old Poor Law attacked: why was change necessary?What were the pressures for change of the Old Poor LawThe ending of the wars with France (1793-1815) led to greater demands for poor relief.The harvests of 1813 and 1814 were good in England and on the continent. The ending of the blockade meant that cheap foreign core could be imported again from Europe which forced English Farmers to keep their prices low. Many went bankrupt

Switching Costs in Australian Home Market and Its Effect on Market Power of Suppliers

1201 words - 5 pages I. Introduction Australia’s housing sector has long been characterised by relatively high homeownership rates and a predominance of variable-rate mortgages (Luci, Lawson & Roberts, 2003, Pg.1). This is why taking on a home loan is one of the common practices in Australia, and a lot of banks and creditors are involved in the market. There are a lot of factors in considering a home loan, namely the switching cost, and the most substantial of

Homelessness

551 words - 2 pages that over twenty thousand elderly Australians are at risk of becoming homeless, or already are homeless. War Veterans are also included in this number, and that equates to approximately two thousand, five hundred homeless War Veterans. Agencies such as the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) are set up to help get homeless people off the streets. Derived from the 1996 census, there was an estimated one hundred and five thousand

Policies Affecting Indigenous Australians

1571 words - 6 pages , was very welcomed by the aboriginal community, as it gave the aboriginals back some of their rights. As the relationship between non-indigenous Australians and indigenous Australians improved, there was a high demand for reconciliation. With many opinions including why the people of today should say sorry for the past Australians injustices. The affects from reconciliation were caused by the controversial approach; there have been numerous speeches, activities and ‘sorry days’. The affects from all the policies varied greatly, due to the differences in the policies. The affects caused change the path of history and have gotten us where we are today.

It is only since 1945 that any real progress has been made in advancing the rights and freedoms of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

1253 words - 5 pages off. This did not work because the difference between the western culture and the Indigenous were far too different for them to adjust. The Aborigines Protection Act 1909 allowed the authorities to give protection, maintenance and education to the Indigenous Australians. The white authorities believed that they were protecting the Aboriginal children from the "bad influence" of their parents who were unable to look after their own children properly

The History Of The Australian Governments Policies From 1788 To Today

1066 words - 4 pages thought when creating this policy that these factors of indigenous Australian lifestyle should be westernized.In conclusion, the policies that has been passed from 1788 till today does not serve justice to an indigenous Australians point of view. It obviously shows that Aboriginal Australians are not excepted in society for meager stereo types. Although it is up to the Government to lift the Aboriginal people to non indigenous Australians level for the

Similar Essays

Why Are Military Takeovers So Frequent In Postcolonial African Politics?

1031 words - 4 pages For many years, the African continent has been a center for political unrest. Much of that political unrest is blamed on the extended period of European colonization that the continent was forced to endure. Because of ethnic differences, natural resources, and ineffective governments, Africa has been subject to many military takeovers in the postcolonial period. Military takeovers are not unique to Africa. Like of many similar countries, the

How And Why Are Latinos Becoming A Powerful Group In American Politics?

844 words - 4 pages How and why are Latinos becoming a powerful group in America Politics? The vice president Joe Biden calls the Hispanics powerful force in America politics Hispanic, Latinos has become a bigger group since 2011, the number has increase a lot. A high number but Hispanic has made big changes in America, help out in some ways. Where fighting for the dream act and know there giving us a chance to have a job and a license. Latinos are coming to the

American Exceptionalism: Why We Are Different From Other Nations

986 words - 4 pages Exceptionalism is not ethnocentric, because if it known as the melting pot then that would mean that different cultures and ethnicities are welcomed into the nation. One culture is not superior over the other. From the Europeans, we are very different. We are more accepting, it is the age of Darwinism (evolution), and every time we moved west we changed. Also, in the article. “The American Character” by Louis Masur, states that, in Europe the state

How Does Aristotle’s View Of Politics Differ From That Of Plato’s? Do You Consider That They Are Wholly Opposed?

1847 words - 7 pages How does Aristotle's view of politics differ from that of Plato's? Do you consider that they are wholly opposed?Political philosophy for both Aristotle and Plato was of reasonable concern. One's character, virtues, vices, desire and especially education were relevant to determine a correct system of government. They both opposed relativism, scepticism as well as individualism in sophism (which was gaining popularity at that time) equally both