Why Was Britain The First Nation To Industrialise?

1810 words - 7 pages

201447149 - Sarah Aitchison - V1102201447149 - Sarah Aitchison - V1102HISTORY, School of Humanities: ASSESSMENT FORMStudent's Name:Reg No.:Class Title Class Code V Level: 1 2 3 4 .TopicEssay Tutorial/Seminar Paper Book Review Group Project .Dissertation Proposal Dissertation Other assignment:Marker's Comments and Grades:To be read in conjunction with the History Assessment Guidelines and Level Descriptors on My Place

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Further Comments and AdviceMarker's Name:Date:Why was Britain the first nation to industrialise?201447149Sarah AitchisonThe late 18th and early 19th century was a time of change for the entire world. Historians have researched for many years why some parts of the world took the front line in the push for industrial stability. Undeniably Great Britain led the industrial revolution and as such there are many factors why this small nation, in comparison to the rest of the world, took its place in creating the historical turning point that has made the world what it is today.The industrial revolution can be said to have all began from the agricultural revolution, which arguably began in the 17th century. This revolution brought about the initial changes that were to be the biggest influences on British history for years to come. Developments at that time included the introduction of new potatoes to Britain and enhanced farming procedures. The enclosure movement too helped the economy of the nation, as wealthier people were taking charge of larger areas of land and farming better produce than common people were able. These in turn led to a more healthy food provision and better diets for the people of Britain, and as such led to longer life expectancy and the beginning of a spike in population growth.Following the agricultural revolution the population was on an upward spiral. This led to a larger workforce available in all industries; people were able to work longer hours, and indeed for more years due to the increased life expectancy. "At its peak between 1811 and 1821, the rate of growth in Great Britain was 17 per cent per decade"[1] The larger_____________________________________________1 P.Mathias, The First Industrial Nation (London: Routledge, 2001) p167.workforce were more willing to relocate for better circumstances in factories and mills too, although forced movement occurred as well by the enclosure movement. The new systems in the agricultural field required fewer workers, which led to more in the factory system. This also gave the entrepreneurs more time to focus their minds on works to better Britain. "A proper understanding of early...

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