Why Was The United States Army Forced To Withdraw From Vietnam?

1589 words - 6 pages

The Vietnam War, also known as the American War, and the Second Indochina War started on December 1956. 58,000 Americans were killed. The war ended on the 30th April 1975, along with a withdrawal of the United States army, and the South and the North of Vietnam reunited. The US government, led by Lyndon Baines Johnson, tried to stop communism from spreading in North Vietnam, because if Vietnam became a communist country, the nearby countries, such as Laos, Thailand, and Cambodia may be affected and become communist countries as well, like a domino, gradually turning down the countries in agreeing in being a communist, called the ’domino theory’. On the other hand, South Vietnam was a capitalist. On 1965, the US army flew 8,000 miles, and landed on South Vietnam, to fight against communism. North Vietnam was supported by the USSR, Russia. There are many ways the Vietnamese army, known as the Vietcong, used to win the war, and force the US army to withdraw. In 1969, when Richard Nixon became the new president, he started working on removing the troops from Vietnam. In 1973, there was finally an end in the peace talks that was held in Paris and the United States army backed off. There are also many flaws of the US army to end up losing the war. The major factors are the tactics of each country, popular support from their home country, weapons, supplies and resources, and lastly, confidence and motivation of the soldiers at war. So what was the main reason that answers the question to, why was the United States army forced to withdraw from Vietnam, and which one is the most important?

Different weapons, supplies and resources are one of the factors, which affected both armies. Firstly, as America was the richest country in the world, they were well supplied, with high-tech weapons, such as the fast, powerful rifles, called M6. All the soldiers were well equipped, and they had help from the air force as well. Helicopters were used to bring the wounded back for treatment, and bomber planes were also effective. Also, their food was luxurious. They had high protein meals, with steak, beer and ice creams. However, the Vietcong were completely the opposite. They were poor, so they only had rice, vegetables, and very little meet, which means that they can live on fewer nutrients than the Americans. There was a road, called the Hoh Chi Min Trail, to bring supplies secretly from North Vietnam, which means that some North Vietnamese also supported the Vietcong. Their weapons were mainly heavy rifles, though they were much more easier to use than the American rifles. They were also clever enough, to reuse the weapons, and equipments of soldiers that they have captured. Being in Vietnam, where they were born, and grew up, they knew every single places of South Vietnam, and so they set booby traps, and pineapple bombs, where lots of soldiers fell for, and lost their lives. All of these evidence tells us that even though the Americans were well supplied, with...

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