William Golding's Lord Of The Flies

1766 words - 7 pages

William Golding's Lord of the Flies

The first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters, concerns and language for the remainder of the book, as well as introducing the main themes of the novel; that the problems in society are related to the sinful nature of man and good verses evil. In Golding’s first chapter, the main characters are introduced, we see many ominous signs of what’s to come through the authors choice of language and the beginning of rivalries, issues and concerns are portrayed which are to continue throughout the rest of the book. The microcosm on the Island is presented from an early stage, as well as themes that emerge and remain important throughout the novel.

Golding introduces the three main characters in the first chapter individually. Ralph, the main protagonist, is tall with fair hair and is introduced first. His attitude when first realising there are no grown-ups around is excitement, and he is looking forward to the prospect of being free of adults. In stark contrast, the second character to be introduced, Piggy, “was shorter than the fair boy and very fat”. These two complete opposites are introduced into the situation very early on, to show the differences and varieties within society. Jack, the last main character to be introduced, is described by Golding as “tall, thin and bony…. his face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness.” Jack is the only other character who is close in physical stature to Ralph, and is from the onset described as a leader.

Ralph, from the second page, seems to have taken control of the situation on the island. Golding reaches this conclusion of the boy effectively through his conversation with Piggy; “This is an island…. That’s a reef out to sea.” These statements show Ralph to have intelligence to make conclusions on his own accord, and we are able to see the character can think for himself. Continuing through the first chapter, after the meeting with the conch, we see Ralph as a natural leader, “there was a stillness about Ralph as he sat that marked him out…. Ralph raised is hand for silence” throughout the clamour of choosing a leader, we see Ralph is willing for others to get their say, yet he is still able to have control over the situation and manages to leave the group in awe of him. Throughout the first meeting, Ralph is perceived as someone who does good, such as calling all the boys together, yet he is not so out of touch that he can’t relate to the normal temptations in life. These qualities Golding describes Ralph to have in this first chapter, and incredibly important for the remainder of the novel.

It is no surprise that Piggy’s nickname is such. When Golding introduces the character, he has just come out of the bushes, after suffering from diarrhoea through eating too many unripe berries. The author continually relates to the fact that the boy is fat, and in many descriptions,...

Find Another Essay On William Golding's Lord of the Flies

William Golding's Lord of the Flies

1911 words - 8 pages William Golding's Lord of the Flies "After all were not savages, we're English and the English are best at everything." - Trace the decline of civilisation during the novel. In this novel we can see the disintegration of reason and civilisation, which is inversely proportional to the rise of hedonistic ideas and savagery. We can also see that the island is a microcosm of the rest of the world, which is also

William Golding's Lord Of The Flies

1629 words - 7 pages The author, William Golding uses the main characters of Ralph, Jack, and Simon in The Lord of the Flies to portray how their desire for leadership, combined with lack of compromise leads to the fall of their society. This desire for leadership and compromise led to the fall of their society just like multiple countries during times of wars

About William Golding's Novel "The Lord of the Flies"

1348 words - 5 pages William Golding's novel 'The Lord of The flies' presents us with a group of English boys who are isolated on a desert island, left to try and retain a civilised society. In this novel Golding manages to display the boys slow descent into savagery as democracy on the island diminishes.At the opening of the novel, Ralph and Jack get on extremely well. We are informed Jack, "shared his burden," and there was an, "invisible light of friendship

The Conch in William Golding's Lord of the Flies

2556 words - 10 pages The Conch in William Golding's Lord of the Flies In William Golding's novel “Lord of the Flies” he uses a lot of symbolism. The entire book is microcosm to the real world, as the novel is set at the time when World War II was going on and on the island there is a hunt at the end of the book symbolic of the war. A symbol Golding uses throughout the book is the conch. It represents authority and order. The person

Symbolism in William Golding's "Lord of the Flies"

1249 words - 5 pages William Golding's "Lord of the Flies" is a parable novel that demonstrates human nature at its most primal level. Lord of the Flies tells the story of a group of British schoolboys stranded on an island as a result of an airplane crash. Because of the absence of civilization, the boys ultimately resort to barbarism. Golding communicates his belief that man's nature is evil; without the restraints of society, humans will revert to their inner

A Critique of William Golding's "Lord of the Flies"

684 words - 3 pages The novel Lord of the Flies, written by William Gerald Golding, is a remarkable piece of literature that discusses many important topics while remaining an enjoyable read. One of the important topics that is discussed in the novel is human nature. Many aspects of human nature is depicted in the book, but one major is the development of a man's personality and character. This aspect of human idiosyncrasy is portrayed through the development of

Jack the Egomaniac in William Golding's Lord of the Flies

1281 words - 5 pages Having an individual take control over a group is inevitable. Adolf Hitler took over Germany; at first he was appointed as chancellor but the Germans’ let him get away with taking over as dictator (Truemen , 2013). It was out of fear that the Germans’ let him be in power. In Lord of the Flies, William Golding utilizes Jack as the most important character in the novel because of how his psychological personality affects the plot. Jack, much like

Lessons Taught By William Golding's "Lord of the Flies"

988 words - 4 pages William Golding’s Lord of the Flies shows man’s inhumanity to man. This novel shows readers good vs. evil through children. It uses their way of coping with being stranded on an island to show us how corrupt humans really are. Man’s inhumanity to man literally means human’s cruelty towards other humans. This is a major theme of the story and is seen throughout it. Golding himself even states that “man produces evil as a bee produces honey

Epilogue to William Golding's Lord of the Flies

2179 words - 9 pages Epilogue to William Golding's Lord of the Flies The officer led the boys to the ship, one by one in a line, they trudged behind him. Jack trailed a few feet behind the group, staring closely at his bare and dirty feet. Each boy, when their turn came, hopped on to the ship and there they were greeted by more navel officers. You could see the smiles appearing across the faces of the boys as they were surrounded by

Analyzing Golding's The Lord of the Flies

1357 words - 6 pages Conforming to societal norms and following the hierarchy plays an important role in daily group dynamics that people participate in. The Robbers Cave study proved that along with the formation of these groups, ingroup hierarchy structures were formed. When certain members of this hierarchy did not live up to what was expected of them, they were replaced. This parallels Jack’s overthrow of Ralph in Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies. After Jack’s

A Comparison of the Film Versions of William Golding's Lord of the Flies

2362 words - 9 pages A Comparison of the Film Versions of William Golding's Lord of the Flies We have read Lord of the Flies by William Golding (1954) and also seen the scene “the death of Piggy” in the two film versions directed by Peter Brook (1961) and Harry Hook (1994). The black and white version by Peter Brook is very close to the text since the characters look the same in the film as they are described. Harry Hooks’ intentions for

Similar Essays

William Golding's "Lord Of The Flies".

895 words - 4 pages The Ironic BattlesThroughout William Golding's Lord of the Flies, irony is reflected among many topicsand between various characters. William Golding forces one to question and analyze the ironicact amongst the boys, the activities occurring on the island and the society that the boys are livingin.In Lord of the Flies, Golding depicted irony throughout the story with the boys on theisland to serve as a reality check for the reader, showing that

William Golding's Lord Of The Flies

1763 words - 8 pages society everyone lives in. What would happen if the people’s democracy fell and everybody is left with nothing? How would the citizens react? Would they act like they were trained to do ever since they were born, or would they disregard all of it and do as they please because there is no definite authority figure to tell them how to live. In William Golding's, The Lord of the Flies, he brilliantly tells a story of life and death and everything

William Golding's Lord Of The Flies

1871 words - 7 pages William Golding's Lord of the Flies "Everything is breaking up. I don't know why." - Ralph What is going wrong on the island and why? The group of evacuees, all boys roughly aged between five and twelve, is dividing into two sets of people, each following either the ideal of civilisation, or the ideal of savagery. At the beginning of the novel, every boy, conditioned by society, was following the ideal of

William Golding's Lord Of The Flies 2526 Words

2526 words - 10 pages William Golding's Lord of the Flies "In 'Lord of the flies' Golding is clearly seeking to explore fundamental human nature and this is apparent from the way in which he portrays the slackening hold of civilisation on the boys can the consequent atavistic regression. By reversing mankind's evolution, he strips the boys to their essential nature