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William Wordsworth And His Love Of Nature

6817 words - 27 pages

Wordsworth has secured the reputation of being one of the great Romantic poets. His verse celebrates the moral influence exerted by nature on human thought and feeling. Considered one of England's greatest poets, he was a key element in the Romantic Movement; know especially for his love of nature, his poetry also resonated with deep philosophic questions. Although often viewed as a 'nature poet' his poetry is not simply concerned with scenic and descriptive evocations of nature, but also with the issues of Man, Human Nature and Man's relationship with the natural world.Wordsworth's monumental poetic legacy rests on a large number of important poems, varying in length and weight from the short, simple lyrics of the 1790s to the vast expanses of The Prelude, thirteen books long in its 1808 edition. "Wordsworth argues that poetry should be written in the natural language of common speech, rather than in the lofty and elaborate dictions that were then considered poetic." (SparkNotes). He argues that "poetry should offer access to the emotions contained in memory". And he argues, "The first principle of poetry should be pleasure, that the chief duty of poetry is to provide pleasure through a rhythmic and beautiful expression of feeling--for all human sympathy, he claims, is based on a subtle pleasure principle that is "the naked and native dignity of man." and makes up a significant part of Wordsworth's poetry (SparkNotes). Wordworth's style remains plainspoken and easy to understand even today, though the rhythms and idioms of common English have changed from those of the early nineteenth century. Many of Wordsworth's poems such as "Tintern Abbey" and the "Intimations of Immortality" deal with the subjects of childhood and the memory of childhood in the mind of the adult, childhood's lost connection with nature, thus which can be preserved only in memory. Wordsworth's images and metaphors mix natural scenery, religious symbolism (as in the sonnet "It is a beauteous evening, calm and free, in which the evening is described as being "quiet as a nun"), and the relics of the poet's rustic childhood--cottages, hedgerows, orchards, and other places where humanity intersects gently and easily with nature.The full title of this poem is "Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour. July 13, 1798." It opens with the reader's declaration that five years have passed since he last visited this location, encountered its tranquil, rustic scenery, and heard the murmuring waters of the river. He recites the objects he sees again, and describes their effect upon him: the "steep and lofty cliffs" impress upon him "thoughts of more deep seclusion"; he leans against the dark sycamore tree and looks at the cottage-grounds and the orchard trees, whose fruit is still unripe. He sees the "wreaths of smoke" rising up from cottage chimneys between the trees, and imagines that they might rise from "vagrant dwellers in the...

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