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William Wordsworth, The Wandering Poet. Essay

1305 words - 5 pages

Through the many works of William Wordsworth is found a vast correlation in his poetry and the experiences which he went through as an early child and throughout the rest of his life. These experiences carved themselves into Wordsworth's mind giving him a favorable ability to put his experiences and emotions into words through his good-natured poetry. To greater understand the poetry he wrote, it is crucial to have a knowledge of the life he lived.William Wordsworth was born the second child of John and Ann Wordsworth in Cockermouth, Cumberland, on April 7, 1770. Wordsworth was living up a decently good childhood in Cockermouth until 1778, where in March of that year his mother Ann died and the family was split up. Wordsworth's sister Dorothy was sent to live at Halifax with her mother's cousin, and the boys of the family were sent to school at Hawkshead where they were educated well and cared for. It was young William's headmaster at Hawkshead who first encouraged him to read and write poetry. Wordsworth also happened to later write a poem about this early time in his life called "The Prelude." In this poem Wordsworth directly conveys the childish activities which he experienced which seemed quite normal, but would later develop him into a great poet.Four years had passed since his mother died and then, on December 30th, 1983 after celebrating the Christmas holidays, his father passed away at Wordsworth's young age of thirteen. After this occurrence their house was given up and the boys were made to live with their maternal grandparents the Cooksons, and their uncle, Christopher Crackanthoope Cookson. At this time in Wordsworth's life he underwent a significant change experienced dependency through patronization and also underwent a rebellious state from having to live with people who weren't parents and surely wasn't as fond of. Having an uneasy and restless mind, Wordsworth left for St. John's College, Cambridge, in the fall of 1787. Three years later in 1790 Wordsworth had already given up any intent on earning an honors degree. In 1791 Wordsworth left to visit France to lean the language but ended up receiving a political education which would effect his poetry through his observation of the government and his friendship with and army officer named Michel de Beaupuy. "Through this experience Wordsworth developed a mind state which included a view against corruption and poverty and he looked to a more utopian time in which men could live in brotherhood and the world could be a better place." (Cumbria) Not only did he experience a political rousing here he also met his lover, Annete Vallon who soon became pregnant.Wordsworth at this time really began his work into poetry with the first publication of his poems. These included "An Evening Walk" and "Descriptive Sketches" which both appeared on January 29th, 1793. Three days later France declared war on England and England quickly responded by declaring war on France. This event greatly...

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