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Women In The Nineteenth Century Essay

906 words - 4 pages

No matter what time period women are in they do not have as much freedom as men do and they aren’t treated equally. Back in the late nineteenth century women didn’t have as much freedom as they do now days. This is seen through “Neighbour Rosicky” and “The Yellow Wall-Paper”. However in “A Sweat-Shop Romance” and “Daisy Miller” we see some change in what women can and can’t do and how they are seen outside of home. Throughout this essay the social roles, roles in families and economic status’s of women will be described. This paper will touch on points like, the idea of holding on to old traditions and ways versus, letting go of old ways changing our mindset and becoming more industrialized as the society around us changes.
Although in the late nineteenth century many people were working in factories and living in the city. In Neighbour Rosicky, Rosicky was trying to hold on to the old ways of life. He believed it was much more simple and “free”. Rosicky decided to live on the farm and wanted his sons to do the same because, “You didn’t have to choose between bosses and strikers, and go wrong either way” (743). He considers all this because he worked in the city when he was younger. Though he did make lots of money and went out occasionally Rosicky saw the people of the city to be “cruel” and “dishonest”. The roles of each family member on the farm differed according to their gender. The men would go out and work on the farm while the women stayed at home, prepared meals and did work around the house. Rosicky’s older son’s wife, Polly, was a city girl before she married Rudolph. Rosicky is concerned that Rudolph might take a job in the city because his wife isn’t used to the farm life and they are struggling financially.

In “The Yellow Wall-Paper” we can see that the narrator expresses that women are trapped and don’t have freedom to express themselves without being judged. Many can interpret this story as showing how woman can start out being depressed and end up becoming crazy because they are isolated. When the narrator tries to tell her husband she wants to leave and that she is not getting better her husband disagrees and thinks she is doing alright and says they can’t leave because the repairs at the other house are not done yet. He simply says, “I am a doctor, dear, and I know” (514). When John said this it made me realize that a women’s opinion didn’t matter. John didn’t even take her thoughts into consideration. Just because John is...

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